Spanish 1 Final Exam Essay Prompt - Essay for you

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Spanish 1 Final Exam Essay Prompt

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International Political Economy (Fall 09) - Final Exam

Overview

The final exam will be distributed on Thursday, 3 December at 5:30 PM. It will be due (via email) by 10:30 PM on Tuesday, 8 December. In total, the exam should not take more than a few hours to complete.

The questions on this exam will be based on the discussion questions considered each week. (Indeed, the questions may even be precisely the same.) The best method of exam preparation will thus be to diligently develop responses to the discussion questions while preparing for the discussions, to take good notes during discussion, and to expand and revise one’s notes after the discussions. Suffice it to say, those students who have kept up throughout the term will not find many surprises. Those who have not may find themselves working more during the exam period than they would like.

Policies and Procedures

All of the standard rules–word counts, tardiness penalties, and formatting guidelines–apply for this exam. You can review those policies here. (This, among other things, means that you should include a bibliography with this exam.) Additionally, please note the following for this final exam:

  • This is an exam. and I remind you to treat it as such. While I encouraged you to help one another with the essay assignments, I would like you to complete this exam entirely on your own. Please remember that the honor code applies, as always.
  • I will happily answer clarification questions; but I would like you to develop the substance of your responses on your own.
  • Please include individual word counts for each answer. Each question has its own word limit and will be scored separately.
Exam Deadline

Lastly, please do not wait until the last minute to submit the exam. I have obliged myself to continue being strict in enforcing the tardiness penalties. I will do so with the exam as well. If you submit the exam more than 24 hours in advance, I commit to confirming its receipt before I go to bed that evening. I will also try to confirm receipt of the exams on an ongoing basis, but I will be away from email periodically. Remember that the closer you come to that deadline, the smaller the margin of error–and the window for redressing such errors!–becomes. If you have any problems and/or doubts, send me a separate email (without attachments) to make inquiries and try to call me (802.458.0633).

Again, THE ESSAY IS DUE (VIA EMAIL) BY by 10:30 PM ON TUESDAY, 8 DECEMBER.

Exam Questions

Respond to the three following prompts (plus the bonus question, if you would like) within the prescribed word limits. All told, your final exam should have no more than 1700 words. When writing this exam, remember to answer all of the questions raised by each prompt. (Do not ignore any of the questions within the prompts!) This is slightly different from writing an essay in which you construct and defend an argument. Here your primary purpose is to demonstrate your knowledge and understanding by answering pitched questions.

PROMPT ONE: Answer either (a) or (b) in 400 (or fewer) words.

  • (a) John Locke and Adam Smith both offer accounts of the origin and purpose of political society. How do these views compare? What are the implications of these views for their theories of the role of the state in the market?
  • (b) What is the difference between the de jure and the de facto exchange rate regimes? Why is this difference significant? How does this difference come about? Which regime do you think matters more?


PROMPT TWO: Answer the following question in 650 (or fewer) words.

  • After the First World War, world leaders attempted to return to the prewar levels of economic integration and cooperation. These attempts, however, largely failed. In the early 1930s, the “new gold standard” collapsed and virtually every state imposed restrictions on trade. The regimes established after the Second World War seem to have proven a good deal more durable. The GATT, the IMF, and the World Bank all remain major players in the global economy, albeit with evolved roles. Understanding the origins of these enduring regimes may be among the most important questions we can tackle in the study of IPE. Choose either the post-WWII trade regime or the post-WWII international monetary system. Describe its major features, and explain its origins. Be sure to consider all of the potential explanations we have considered in lecture, discussion, and our readings. (See Topic 3 for the types of explanations we’ve covered.) Where these explanations conflict, highlight those conflicts. Where synthesis is possible, make the synthesis. Do be sure to be as thorough as you can be given the space available.

PROMPT THREE: Answer (a) or (b) in 650 (or fewer) words.

  • (a) The question of “global imbalances” has entered the public consciousness so profoundly that it was recently the subject of a Saturday Night Live skit between “President Obama” and “President Hu Jintao.” What is the nature of this “global imbalance”? What are its primary causes? What are the implications of leaving these imbalances unaddressed? Are there any illuminating examples of such unresolved imbalances from the past? What constraints do international regimes like the WTO and the IMF impose on our ability to resolve these imbalances? If it were possible to reform these regimes towards the end of alleviating imbalance, how would you recommend we do so? (While I encourage you to watch the funny SNL skit, I trust you’ll base your analysis on more serious renderings!)
  • (b) The Brundtland Commission defined “sustainable development” rather broadly and, at the same time, privileged it as a top policy priority. How much relative importance would you assign to “sustainability” compared to other goals like encouraging development, defending human rights, limiting nuclear proliferation, thwarting terrorism, resolving ethnic conflict, &c. What do you see as the relationship between the several facets of globalization: population growth, environmental impact, and indebtedness? Is sustainability necessarily at odds with globalization? What constraints do international regimes–or the lack thereof–impose on our ability to pursue sustainability? If it were possible to reform these regimes towards the end of increasing sustainability, how would you recommend we do so?

OPTIONAL BONUS QUESTION: Answer this question in exactly 10 words.

  • Economic historian CR Fay wrote, “No man is so surely at the back of English economics—of the classical political economy, and of the rebel economics of early English Socialism—as the philosopher John Locke.” What might have caused CR Fay to make such an incredibly stupid statement?
Pages James Ashley Morrison

Department of Political Science
Robert A Jones '59 House, B04
Middlebury College
Middlebury, VT 05734
802.443.5442

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AP Central - The AP Spanish Language and Culture Exam

AP Central Exam Overview

AP SPANISH LANGUAGE AND CULTURE EXAM: 3 HOURS

Exam questions are based on the six learning objectives and assess all themes. As much as possible, students read and listen to authentic texts from the Spanish-speaking world throughout the exam.

Format of Assessment

Section I: Multiple Choice | 65 Questions |

95 Minutes | 50% of Exam Score
  • Part A: 30 questions;
40 minutes
  • Interpretive Communication: Print Texts
  • Part B: 35 Questions; 55 minutes
    • Interpretive Communication: Print and Audio Texts (combined)
    • Interpretive Communication: Audio Texts
  • Section II: Free Response | 4 Tasks |

    85 Minutes | 50% of Exam Score
    • Interpersonal Writing: Email Reply (1 prompt; 15 minutes)
    • Presentational Writing: Persuasive Essay (1 prompt;
    55 minutes total: 15 minutes to review materials plus 40 minutes to write)
  • Interpersonal Speaking: Conversation (5 prompts; 20 seconds for each response)
  • Presentational Speaking: Cultural Comparison (1 prompt; 6 minutes)
  • Multiple-Choice Questions

    For sample multiple-choice questions, refer to the Course and Exam Description.

    Free-Response Questions

    Below are free-response questions from past AP Spanish Language and Culture Exams.

    Past AP Spanish Language Exam Questions

    The College Board provides free-response questions from past AP Spanish Language and Culture Exams. These questions do not reflect the redesigned AP Spanish Language Exam administered for the first time in May 2014, but the question types are the same and the topics similar, making them a valuable resource for students and teachers. Included with the questions are scoring guidelines, sample student responses, and commentary on those responses, as well as exam statistics and the Student Performance Q&A (Chief Reader's Report) for the May 2013 administrations and before.

    More About Spanish Language and Culture Are You a Student? See Also.
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    Final Exam

    For this exam, you are to select one essay prompt from each section and write a one page essay with the following guidelines:

    Include the prompt in bold at the top of each page.

    Use 10pt font, single linespacing, and one inch margins.

    Feel free to include diagrams or pictures.

    Use information and ideas we discussed in class to support your essay.

    The one page limit is a soft-limit; you may go over, but you should do your best to be concise.

    Have all of the essays in one PDF and email it to the instructor by 5pm on Thursday, May 16th. Use the email subject [CS.491.S13] Final Exam (USERID) .

    1. Cloud Computing

    ELI5: What is cloud computing? If your parents or friends asked you what cloud computing is, what would you tell them? What are the ways that people interact with cloud computing and what issues or concerns should they have? Provide specific examples of how people interact with the cloud either directly or indirectly. Is the cloud here to stay or will it just float away?

    Job Interview: Suppose you were interviewing for an IT or software development job and the interviewer asked you to explain cloud computing and your experience with it. What are the fundamental components and principles of the cloud? Why would a company use the cloud (or why would it not)? What would you say about your experience with cloud computing?

    2. Platforms

    Borg: In typical Microsoft fashion, Windows Azure is a cloud computing platform that is a little bit of everything: IaaS, PaaS, and SaaS. Explain what these aaS terms mean and describe how Windows Azure fits each of these profiles (identify a specific Azure service for each of the three profiles). Discuss why you think Microsoft is using this approach and if you think it will succeed.

    Startup: Suppose you were making this amazing new web application with thousands to millions of active users. What cloud computing provider would you use? Explain your choice and describe some of the vendor specific features you could take advantage of to make your application scale. Would there be any downsides to your choice? If so, how could you overcome or mitigate them?

    3. Web Services

    Legacy: You didn't listen; You took that job working for that financial institution and have been stuck writing internal Java business applications. Fortunately, the new hot shot manager wants to interface the legacy J2EE thingy-a-bopper to the interwebs via some sort of web service. Describe what technologies you would use to accomplish this task. What components are required for an enterprise web service? How would the web service be utilized? What are some of the benefits of adopting a web service model for legacy business applications?

    REST: You were a total rock star at UWEC, and managed to get a job at Google. They have put you on the Google Play team and want you to help design a RESTful API for the Google Music service. Describe the principles of RESTful web services and sketch out an example of a RESTful interface to the Google Music playlist (i.e. the API should support operations such as adding a song, removing a song, deleting a song, getting information about a song, etc.). How would operations be performed and how would information or data be transfered? Are there any downsides to RESTful web design?

    4. Optimizations

    Tricks: Imgur has a problem: A bunch of low-lifes keep uploading a gazillion lolcat pictures to their servers, causing their systems to overload with too many requests. Describe three optimization tricks Imgur could utilize to improve their scalability. For each technique discuss how and why it works, and examine the benefits and costs of the method. It may be fruitful to first identify some possible sources of bottlenecks and then describe methods to mitigate each performance barrier.

    Tables: In the first half of the semester, we discussed NoSQL systems such as BigTable and Dynamo. In this half of the semester, we talked about Memcache, which closely resembles these systems. First, explain what Memcache is and how it works. Likewise, describe how you would use it to optimize a website. Finally, discuss whether or not Memcache is an example of a NoSQL datastore by comparing and contrasting it with either BigTable or Dynamo.

    5. Reflection

    Likes/Dislikes. What were your favorite papers from this semester? Describe what are the key components of an academic paper and what makes a paper enjoyable to read. Likewise, identify your least favorite papers and describe why they were less enjoyable. Finally, discuss if and how reading these papers has changed your view of Computer Science and how knowledge is formed. Do you think you could write a paper like the ones you read in class? Why or why not?

    Application. Now that you have had a taste of cloud computing in a special electives course, consider how different aspects of this class could be applied to other Computer Science courses. Describe how cloud computing could be utilized in assignments or labs in other classes (provide examples). Additionally, discuss whether or not reading of academic papers should be incorporated into other classes. Finally, consider whether or not a large final group project is a good idea or not by reflecting on your experience in this class.

    WRT 305

    Exam Essays

    Twice this semester, once at mid-term and once at the course's end, I'll assign a short exam essay, each of which is worth 500 points. Here are some of the details, the rest of which will follow when I assign the exam. You must pass either the mid-term or the final essay with a grade of C or better to pass this section of WRT 305 regardless of the points you have accrued.

    Mid-term Exam Essay
    On February 17th, I will assign the Mid-Term Exam Essay, and you will have about two weeks to complete it. I will give you six writing prompts, some of which will be questions used in the past as prompts for the WRT 305 placement exam. You will select one prompt and respond with a 800-1000 word essay. Try to use outside sources to help you make your point and make sure you cite those sources as best you can using any official style (MLA, APA, etc.). In your essay, pay attention to the basic principles we've discussed over the term relating to audience,m purpose, focus, structure, genre, style and high-ethos. Also, try to implement a full writing process, including prewriting, research, drafting, revising, and editing—all of which we will discuss in class. In the end, you want to present an essay that is focused, well-organized, clearly written, and mechanically correct. It should be written at a level appropriate for a college graduate.

    Please upload your Mid-term Exam Essay to Blackboard and then bring in a hard copy for submission in class on Thursday, March 4th. To upload your essay, save it as a Word or RTF file and then click on the "Mid-term Essay" link on the Assignments sidebar on Blackboard. Attach your file and then hit submit. Please print your hard copy single-spaced for me, and indicate the number of the prompt to which you are responding.

    I'll post the essay prompts to Blackboard when the time comes to formally assign this essay.

    Final Exam Essay
    On April 15th, I will assign the Final Exam Essay, and if you decide to take it (or if you need to take it), you will have about two weeks to complete it. I will give you four writing prompts, some of which will be questions used in the past as prompts for the WRT 305 placement exam. You will select one prompt and respond with a 1000-1400 word essay. You must use outside sources to help you make your point and make sure you cite those sources as best you can using any official style (MLA, APA, etc.). In your essay, pay attention to the basic principles we've discussed over the term relating to audience,m purpose, focus, structure, genre, style and high-ethos. Also, try to implement a full writing process, including prewriting, research, drafting, revising, and editing. In the end, you want to present an essay that is focused, well-organized, clearly written, and mechanically correct. It should be written at a level appropriate for a college graduate.

    I'll post the essay prompts to Blackboard when the time comes to formally assign this essay.

    Note: If you do not pass the Mid-term Essay, you must pass the Final Exam Essay to get a passing grade in the course, regardless of how many points you have accrued. If you have passed the Mid-term Exam Essay, however, you do not have to write the Final Exam Essay. Instead, I will enter the score you earned on the Mid-term Exam Essay for the Final Exam Essay and you are done. If you passed the Mid-term and think you want to try again for a higher score, you can elect to try it again, but if you score lower than you did on the Mid-term, I will record the lower score in the grade book.

    • Example 1: Andy got 50 out of 500 possible points on the Mid-term, which is a failing score. He must write the Final Exam Essay to pass the course—when he scores a 350, he will get a total of 400 points in the gradebook for the Demonstration portion of the course, and he will be eligible to pass the course assuming he has enough points.
    • Example 2: Candy passed the Mid-Term Essay with 400 points, so she does not have to take the Final. Instead, I can enter 400 points for her Final Exam Essay in the gradebook, giving her a total of 800 points out of 1000 for the Demonstration portion of the course. She, as well, is eligible to pass the course, assuming she has enough points.
    • Example 3: Mandy passed the Mid-term with 350 points, so she does not have to take the Final. While I could enter 350 points for her Final Exam Essay in the gradebook, giving her a total of 700 points out of 1000 for the Demonstration portion of the course, Mandy elects to take the Final Exam Essay to try and earn a few extra points. When she scores just 300 on the Final, she will have earned a total 650 total points for the Demonstration portion of the course, which would be less than she would have received had she just gone with her original score.

    Please upload your Final Exam Essay to Blackboard and then bring a hard copy for submission to my office in LOH 209 before the end of our scheduled Final Exam Period—see our course schedule. If I am not in the office when you come by, slip your work under my office door. To upload your essay, save it as a Word or RTF file and then click on the "Mid-term Essay" link on the Assignments sidebar on Blackboard. Attach your file and then hit submit. Please print your hard copy single-spaced for me, and indicate the number of the prompt to which you are responding.

    Last Updated: 6 January 2011

    AP Spanish Language and Culture Exam Dates and Information – AP Students – The College Board

    AP Spanish Language and Culture About the Exam Exam Resources

    The exam is approximately 3 hours long and includes both a 95 minute multiple-choice section and an 85 minute free-response section. The multiple-choice section accounts for 50% your exam grade, and the free-response section for the other 50%.

    Section I: Multiple Choice

    Part A: Interpretive Communication. Print Texts — 30 questions;

    • This section consists of a variety of authentic print materials (e.g. journalistic and literary texts, announcements, advertisements, letters, charts, maps, and tables). You will respond to questions about these authentic materials that ask for main ideas and supporting details, questions about the meaning of vocabulary words in context, as well as questions that ask you about the author’s point of view or the target audience.

    Part B: Interpretive Communication. Print and Audio Texts (combined), followed by Audio Texts: 35 questions,

    • This section consists of a variety of authentic audio materials, including interviews, podcasts, public service announcements, conversations, and brief presentations. This section is divided into two subsections. The first subsection includes audio texts that are paired with print materials; the second consists solely of audio texts. You will have time to read a preview of each selection and skim the questions before listening to the audio. All audio texts will be played twice.

    You are encouraged to take notes during this part of the exam and are given writing space for that purpose. Your notes will not be graded.

    Total scores on the multiple-choice section are based on the number of questions answered correctly. Points are not deducted for incorrect answers and no points are awarded for unanswered questions.

    Section II: Free Response — 4 Tasks;

    Interpersonal Writing: Email Reply

    You read an email and write a reply in which you must respond to questions and provide requested information. You have 15 minutes to read the email and respond to it. This task is worth 12.5% of the final exam grade.

    Presentational Writing: Persuasive Essay

    You are given an essay prompt and three authentic sources (an article, a chart, graph, or table, and an audio source) which represent different points of view about the topic of the prompt. You then prepare and write a persuasive essay in which you state your point of view and integrate information from the three sources to support your perspective. You have approximately 55 minutes to interpret the sources and write your essay. You have access to the print sources and your notes from the audio source while you write your essay. This task is worth 12.5% of the final exam grade.

    Interpersonal Speaking: Conversation

    You are given an outline of a conversation. You then engage in the conversation by responding to five prompts. You have 20 seconds for each response. This task is worth 12.5% of the final exam grade.

    Presentational Speaking: Cultural Comparison

    You are given one prompt about a cultural topic. You prepare and then present an oral presentation in which you compare and contrast perspectives or attitudes about this cultural topic in your own community with those in a Spanish-speaking community with which you are familiar. You have 4 minutes to read the prompt and prepare your answer, and 2 minutes to present and record your presentation. This task is worth 12.5% of the final exam grade.

    Links to More AP Pages

    What is an Essay Exam? (with pictures) - mobile wiseGEEK

    wiseGEEK: What is an Essay Exam?

    An essay exam is an examination in which respondents answer exam questions with essays. This type of exam is designed to test not only knowledge, but the ability to organize and present thoughts under pressure. Essay exams are also used to assess spelling ability. Historically, respondents wrote out answers by hand, classically in a “blue book,” but today, many essay exams are administered on the computer, with respondents using a very basic word processing program which will allow them to enter text, delete text, cut text, and paste text, but not to perform complex tasks like spellchecks.

    In an essay exam, the test taker is given a prompt in the form of a question or statement, and asked to respond to it. There are usually no length requirements, although the test may stipulate that it is “short essay,” meaning that the test taker is not expected to go into too much depth with the answers. In some cases, a single question constitutes the entire exam, in which case the essay is expected to be detailed. In other instances, there are several essays, and the test may also include multiple choice, short answer, and other types of questions.

    Some essay exams allow students to prepare first. For example, in a literature class, students may be given a list of essay prompts and told they may select one to answer during the exam, or students may be given a list of potential questions, with the instructor selecting one on the day of the test. The student may be allowed to bring in supporting materials such as an annotated text and limited notes. In these cases, the quality of the essay exam is expected to be higher, because the student has had some preparation time.

    Some students dread essay exams, while others enjoy them.

    Some different test taking skills are definitely needed to do well on an essay exam. Time management is critical, as is the ability to organize thoughts on the fly. It is a good idea to ask for scrap paper which can be used to create a rough outline and to jot down notes before actually starting the essay; taking five minutes to read the prompt carefully, generate an initial response, and rough out an outline will improve the quality of the essay substantially.

    Students who are unfamiliar with the format may want to practice before they have to perform in a test environment. Numerous sample essay exam questions on a variety of topics are available on the Internet; a student can select one to respond to, set a time limit, and write out an essay. This can also be a useful study aid, as it will help the student think about the topic in new ways.

    Article Discussion

    3) @ FrameMaker- I find that most essay questions tend to focus on themes from a class or subject rather than individual definitions. They may ask you to describe how a system works, or explain a concept. I find that the easiest way to study for these questions is to look for these themes throughout the course and practice writing them out.

    Once you have determined the important themes, creating a system diagram to illustrate how a concept works can be beneficial. It can help you create a visual understanding of who a complex idea works, giving you a step-by-step diagram on how to write out this thought.

    2) What are good ways to prepare for exam essay questions? I hate these types of questions, and I always do poorly. I always find that the essay questions that are going to be asked are impossible to prepare for. I study like crazy, but when I get to the final essay questions, I find myself stuck. I start confusing terms. If anyone has good advice on how to prepare for these types of exams, I would appreciate it.

    1) 'Tis the season for holidays and exams. I have an exam in a couple of days that is about half short-answer and half essay questions. From the essay exam rubric from previous tests in this class, I know that my professor is a tough grader. She not only looks at the substance of the essay, but also at the writing ability of the student. Students are marked on syntax, word use, spelling, grammar, tone, and voice. I hate these types of tests, but I have to say that knowing I will be facing these types of exams makes me study harder and learn more.

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    English Final Exam Essay Prompts

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    Final Exam

    Final Exam

    Date. Wednesday, 17 December

    Room. same as normal (0111)

    Bring :
    1) A BLUE BOOK (or two) in which to write your essay

    2) You may also bring a 3”x5” index card with notes (I would recommend outlining your answers for the long essay, but you can bring whatever you can squeeze onto this card!).

    The structure of the final

    The final exam will have two sections. The first will be Identification questions, just like the midterm. These questions will be drawn from the list published on Wednesday. You’ll be asked to answer two. This will be worth a smaller portion of the overall grade of the final (20%).

    The majority of the final (80%) will consist of a long comprehensive essay which will ask you to synthesize material from the first and second halves of the semester to answer a question about how ancient empires maintained their imperial power. You’ll want to focus most of your attention on these long essay questions. Two of the three will be on the final and you will have to answer one (so you’ll need to prepare answers for two, unless you like to gamble).

    Each essay prompt is very broad, and you can draw in a lot of different examples from throughout the semester. This is encouraged. A good answer will not just compare two or three empires – it will make an argument. and that argument will be supported with evidence drawn from throughout our semester, multiple primary source readings, and our discussions in class to provide a thoughtful, evidence-based, and original discussion of the questions raised in the essay prompt. Answers that display original thinking are encouraged. Answers that aren’t afraid to go out on a limb, make a claim, and back it up with evidence and examples will do very well.

    You can only do so much in 2 hours, and I’m not grading for perfect. I want to see evidence that you have mastered the material from throughout the semester (not just one or two of the fifteen weeks) and that you’re able to use that material skillfully to make an argument about the age of ancient empires.

    The three long essay prompts

    (Two of these will be on the final, you will answer one)

    1) Various empires (and individual rulers) claimed to restore traditional values, compared themselves to figures from the past, or used stories of past glories or defeats to inspire their followers. How did rulers/empires use the past to enhance their power? How successful were appeals to the past in restoring the stability of (or creating new) empires? When rulers/empires attempted to revive the past, were they successful, or did they end up creating something new? Give specific, concrete examples to support your answer drawn from material before and after the midterm exam, from both primary sources and Cline & Graham / our discussions in class.

    2) Which is most important for an empire’s success in the ancient world: I, E, M, or P? A good answer will argue why one ‘source of social power’ is most important while also considering – and refuting – possible counter-arguments and alternatives. Back up your answer with specific, concrete examples drawn from material before and after the midterm exam, from both primary sources and Cline & Graham / our discussions in class.

    3) Historian Guy Halsall argues that the Western Roman Empire fell not because of external barbarian threats, but because its people decided they did not want to be Roman anymore.* Convincing subjects that they wanted to remain part of an empire was a crucial element of imperial power in the ancient world. What were the most important strategies ancient empires used to make their subjects want to remain part of their empires? Did these strategies vary from empire to empire, or are there common themes? Could an empire fall if its people remained committed to it (or are other factors – like a strong military – able to overcome a people’s commitment to preserving their identity)? Back up your answer with specific, concrete examples drawn from material before and after the midterm exam, from both primary sources and Cline & Graham / our discussions in class.

    * Guy Halsall, Barbarian Migrations (Cambridge University Press, 2007).

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