Undirected Unweighted Graph With An Example Of A Persuasive Essay - Essay for you

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Undirected Unweighted Graph With An Example Of A Persuasive Essay

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Best pathfinding algorithm for undirected unweighted graph - Computer Science Stack Exchange

assuming you don't have any heuristic function about the distance to the target, a good solution that is valid is bi-directional BFS.
Algorithm idea: do a BFS search simultaneously from the source and the target: [BFS until depth 1 in both, until depth 2 in both. ].
The algorithm will end when you find a vertex v, which is in both BFS's front.

Algorithm behavior. The vertex v that terminates the algorithm's run will be exactly in the middle between the source and the target.
This algorithm will yield much better result in most cases then BFS from the source [explanation why it is better then BFS follows], and will surely provide an answer, if one exist.

why is it better then BFS from the source?
assume the distance between source to target is k. and the branch factor is B [every vertex has B edges].
BFS will open: 1 + B + B^2 +. + B^k vertices.
bi-directional BFS will open: 2 + 2B + 2B^2 + 2B^3 +. + 2B^(k/2) vertices.

for large B and k, the second is obviously much better than the first.

NOTE, that this solution does NOT require storing the whole graph in memory, it only requires implementing a function: successor(v) which returns all the successors of a vertex [all vertices you can get to, within 1 step from v]. With this, only the nodes you open [ 2 + 2B +. + 2B^(k/2) as explained above] should be stored. To further save memory, you can use Iterative Deepening DFS from one direction, instead of BFS, but it will consume more time.

In your case, the difference between BFS and bi-directional BFS, assuming 6 degrees of seperation is between developing

200^6 = 2.4e13 nodes, and 2*200^3=16,000,000. As you can see, bi-directional BFS needs much less nodes to be developed than the alternative.

Other articles

Traversing an undirected, unweighted graph with a twist: minimum visits to each node - Stack Overflow

I'm trying to write code that will traverse an undirected, unweighted graph. Essentially, the method will be passed a node (which knows all its neighbors). The method then has to build a model of the graph as efficiently* by going from node to node and collecting information which nodes link to each other. At the end, the method will have a complete list of all the nodes and all the vertices that connect them.

*The crux of the problem lies in the word efficiently and what I mean by it. Let me direct your attention to this small graph:

Let's say I start at node G. I can either visit C, B, F, D, H, J or E. I want to minimize the amount of times I visit a node and in order to visit a node, I must pass through all nodes on the way to that node.

Example: let's say I decide to visit node C. The next node to visit could be either A, B, F, D, H, J or E. However, to visit any node except for A, I would have to pass through G again which is considered inefficient. And in order to visit A, I would have to visit G and C again and then pass through C and then G to get back to the rest of the graph. So I decide to visit A. This means I have to pass through C again to reach G. Thus, from a logical point of view, it makes sense to visit the C branch last.

However, the program, when it starts at Node G, is unaware that branch C leads to a dead-end. As I write this, I think it might be impossible, but I ask it anyways: is there anyway to traverse this graph as efficiently as possible (as I have previously defined it) using only the information given (i.e. that the program only knows about the nodes its visited and the edges emanating from those nodes? Or should I just go with a variation Dijkstra's algorithm in order to insure I visit every node?

This will all be written in Java if that matters.

asked Nov 27 '10 at 7:54

Do you want simply to traverse the whole graph (regardless of the path taken), and do some operation on each node, or do you want to compute the shortest path from one node to any other node? (I might not understand your goal.)

In the first case, stick to a traversal algorithm such as Breadth First Search . For the other, you may want to consider Dijkstra by using same-weighted edges (i.e. = 1).

You can see the BFS as a special case of Dijkstra when you are interested only in one starting node and all edges have the same weight. With different costs you could use Uniform Cost Search.

answered Nov 27 '10 at 8:34

Would a DFS be more efficient taking into consideration the numerous cycles? I guess I can write both and find out experimentally using a number of data sets. I can't believe I forgot this, but it's probably the best answer. Thanks! – Smipims Nov 27 '10 at 8:40

@Smipims, Breadth First Search or Djikstra will not be any better or worse cycle wise than the recursion. In order to visit all nodes, you need to visit all nodes. There may be an advantage in using a non-recursive solution to avoid a too deep call stack (for large graphs). – Martin Algesten Nov 27 '10 at 8:49

I guess it all depends on the resource you have and that you value more: time and/or memory-space: consider that you have to keep track of the nodes expanded but to be visited yet in the BFS. If your graph can stay all in memory I guess it does not matter (but imagine an implicit graph that you explore only node-by-node) – rano Nov 27 '10 at 8:50

An interesting problem. but still not clear what the original problem/goal is from the responses to-date.

Is this a valid re-statement of the problem?:

  • The start node is specified
  • The cost to visit each node is "1"
  • Objective: visit each node
  • Objective: plan a route that minimizes cost
  • Constraint: the final node is not specified (it may be any node)
  • The algorithm has full knowledge of the graph before any costs are incurred (searching every possible path does not -- itself -- incur any cost)

If that is a correct "read" of your problem, then consider these observations:

  • If the cost to "visit a node" is "1", that is the same as "the cost to traverse any edge" is "1". since the there is a one-to-one correspondence between "visiting a node" and "traversing an edge". (You can't enter a node except by traversing its in-edge.)
  • If two nodes are not directly connected, they are still "transitively connected", as you can simply traverse the intervening nodes. (Alternately: you appear to NOT have the constraint "you may not re-visit a node".)

Thus: all nodes are "connected" via some "distance", and you want to visit all nodes, while minimizing the "distance" traveled.

Is that correct?

If so, I submit that your problem is almost exactly the classical "Traveling Salesman Problem". The only difference I see is that sometimes the statement of the TSP requires "start-node and end-node to be the same". But -- I think -- you allow the start-node and end-node to be different.

If that sounds right -- and you are really just trying to "solve" the TSP in an efficient manner -- then join the multitudes ahead of you who have tried to do the same thing! There might not be a better solution than simply "try all combinations, score each, and take the minimum".

Graphs - Terminology and Representation

Graphs - Terminology and Representation Overview
  • Definitions: Vertices, edges, paths, etc
  • Representations: Adjacency list and adjacency matrix

Definitions: Graph, Vertices, Edges
  • Define a graph G = (V, E) by defining a pair of sets:
    1. V = a set of vertices
    2. E = a set of edges

  • Edges:
    • Each edge is defined by a pair of vertices
    • An edge connects the vertices that define it
    • In some cases, the vertices can be the same

  • Vertices:
    • Vertices also called nodes
    • Denote vertices with labels

  • Representation:
    • Represent vertices with circles, perhaps containing a label
    • Represent edges with lines between circles

  • Example:
    • V =
    • E = <(A,B),(A,C),(A,D),(B,D),(C,D)>


Motivation
  • Many algorithms use a graph representation to represent data or the problem to be solved
  • Examples:
    • Cities with distances between
    • Roads with distances between intersection points
    • Course prerequisites
    • Network
    • Social networks
    • Program call graph and variable dependency graph

Graph Classifications
  • There are seveal common kinds of graphs
    • Weighted or unweighted
    • Directed or undirected
    • Cyclic or acyclic

  • Choose the kind required for problem and determined by data
  • We examine each below

Kinds of Graphs: Weighted and Unweighted
  • Graphs can be classified by whether or not their edges have weights
  • Weighted graph. edges have a weight
    • Weight typically shows cost of traversing
    • Example: weights are distances between cities

  • Unweighted graph. edges have no weight
    • Edges simply show connections
    • Example: course prereqs

Kinds of Graphs: Directed and Undirected
  • Graphs can be classified by whether or their edges are have direction
    • Undirected Graphs. each edge can be traversed in either direction
    • Directed Graphs. each edge can be traversed only in a specified direction

Undirected Graphs
  • Undirected Graph. no implied direction on edge between nodes
    • The example from above is an undirected graph

    • In diagrams, edges have no direction (ie they are not arrows)
    • Can traverse edges in either directions

  • In an undirected graph, an edge is an unordered pair
    • Actually, an edge is a set of 2 nodes, but for simplicity we write it with parens
      • For example, we write (A, B) instead of
      • Thus, (A,B) = (B,A), etc
      • If (A,B) ∈ E then (B,A) ∈ E

    • Formally: ∀ u,v ∈ E, (u,v)=(v,u) and u ≠ v

  • A node normally does not have an edge to itself

Directed Graphs
  • Digraph. A graph whose edges are directed (ie have a direction)
    • Edge drawn as arrow
    • Edge can only be traversed in direction of arrow
    • Example: E = <(A,B), (A,C), (A,D), (B,C), (D,C) >
    • Examples: courses and prerequisites, program call graph
  • In a digraph, an edge is an ordered pair
    • Thus: (u,v) and (v,u) are not the same edge
    • In the example, (D,C) ∈ E, (C,D) ∉ E
    • What would edge (B,A) look like? Remember (A,B) ≠ (B,A)

  • A node can have an edge to itself (eg (A,A) is valid)

Subgraph
  • If graph G=(V, E)
    • Then Graph G'=(V',E') is a subgraph of G if V' ⊆ V and E' ⊆ E and

  • Example.

Degree of a Node
  • The degree of a node is the number of edges the node is used to define
  • In the example above:
    • Degree 2: B and C
    • Degree 3: A and D
    • A and D have odd degree. and B and C have even degree

  • Can also define in-degree and out-degree
    • In-degree: Number of edges pointing to a node
    • Out-degree: Number of edges pointing from a node
    • Whare are the in- and out-degree of the example?

Graphs: Terminology Involving Paths
  • Path. sequence of vertices in which each pair of successive vertices is connected by an edge
  • Cycle. a path that starts and ends on the same vertex
  • Simple path. a path that does not cross itself
    • That is, no vertex is repeated (except first and last)
    • Simple paths cannot contain cycles

  • Length of a path: Number of edges in the path
    • Sometimes the sum of the weights of the edges

  • Examples
    • A sequence of vertices: (A, B, C, D) [Is this path, simple path, cycle?]
    • (A, B, D, A, C) [path, simple path, cycle?]
    • (A, B, D, A, C) [path, simple path, cycle?]
    • Cycle.
    • Simple Cycle.
    • Lengths?

Cyclic and Acyclic Graphs Connected and Unconnected Graphs and Connected Components
  • An undirected graph is connected if every pair of vertices has a path between it
    • Otherwise it is unconnected
    • Give an example of a connected graph

  • An unconnected graph can be broken in to connected components
  • A directed graph is strongly connected if every pair of vertices has a path between them, in both directions

Trees and Minimum Spanning Trees
  • Tree: undirected, connected graph with no cycles
    • Example.
    • If G=(V, E) is a tree, how many edges in G?

  • Spanning tree: a spanning tree of G is a connected subgraph of G that is a tree
    • Example.

  • Minimum spanning tree (MST): a spanning tree with minimum weight
    • Example.

  • Spanning trees and minimum spanning tree are not necessarily unique
  • We will look at two famous MST algorithms: Prim's and Kruskal's

Data Structures for Representing Graphs
  • Two common data structures for representing graphs:
    • Adjacency lists
    • Adjacency matrix

Adjacency List Representation
  • Each node has a list of adjacent nodes
  • Example (undirected graph):
    • A: B, C, D
    • B: A, D
    • C: A, D
    • D: A, B, C

  • Example (directed graph):
    • A: B, C, D
    • B: D
    • C: Nil
    • D: C

  • Weighted graph can store weights in list
  • Space: Θ(V + E) (ie |V| + |E|)
  • Time:
    • To visit each node that is adjacent to node u: Θ(degree(u))
    • To determine if node u is adjacent to node v: Θ(degree(u))

Adjacency Matrix Representation
  • Adjacency Matrix. 2D array containing weights on edges
    • Row for each vertex
    • Column for each vertex
    • Entries contain weight of edge from row vertex to column vertex
    • Entries contain ∞ (ie Integer'last) if no edge from row vertex to column vertex
    • Entries contain 0 on diagonal (if self edges not allowed)

  • Example undirected graph (assume self-edges not allowed):

Finding all paths on undirected graph

@Boris Is it possible, though, to get some nicer estimates on the complexity of enumerating all paths in terms of how many such paths there are? It won't be polynomial in the number of nodes of the graph, but the enumeration might be polynomial in the number of paths it outputs, or something like that? Or is there an obstruction to such an algorithm as well? – Mikael Vejdemo-Johansson Mar 18 '10 at 16:49

@mikael that's not a problem. start at the first node, and do a DFS. Each time you reach the second node, spit out the current path, and note which edge on the stack got you there. So overall the time taken is linear in the total length of all the paths, which is at most n times the number of paths. – Suresh Venkat Mar 18 '10 at 17:31

@Suresh: Are you sure a DFS will find all paths? Asssume two $K_n$ connected by a single bridge edge, with the source node in one $K_n$ and the target node in the other. DFS will traverse the bride edge exactly once, while there is certainly a much larger number of distinct paths from source to target that are crossing this edge. – MRA Mar 19 '10 at 12:50

There is an easy way to partition the set of $s$-$t$ paths in a graph $G$. Fix an edge $tt'$ in $G$. Let $P_1$ be the set of paths from $s$ to $t$ which use the edge $tt'$, and let $P_2$ be the set of paths from $s$ to $t$ in $G-tt'$. Then $P_1 \cap P_2 = \emptyset$ and the set of $s$-$t$ paths $P = P_1 \cup P_2$. Moreover, there is a one to one correspondence between the set of paths $P_1$ and the set of $s$-$t'$ paths in the graph $G-t$.

Thus, we get an easy recursive algorithm to find the set of paths $s$-$t$ paths in a graph $G$. Pick an edge $tt'$ incident the vertex $t$ and recursively calculate the sets $P_1$ and $P_2$. With a small amount of pre-processing, we can ensure that the runtime is $O(m(p+1))$ where $m$ is the number of edges and $p$ is the number of $s$-$t$ paths.

To make the recurrence relation on the runtime work, consider the following. We can test in time $O(m)$ if a given graph $G$ and pair of vertices $s$ and $t$ if $G$ has 0, exactly one, or at least two distinct $s$-$t$ paths. To see this, simply find the block decomposition of the graph and, and check if there is any non-trivial block between $s$ and $t$ in the tree.

We can push this slightly farther. Given an instance of the problem $G$ and vertices $s$ and $t$, we can reduce the problem in time $O(m)$ to a graph $\bar$ and vertices $x$ and $y$ such that for all edges $xx'$ incident to $x$, we have that

To see this, again using the block decomposition, we contract any bridge in the graph and delete edges not contained in any $s$-$t$ path. As above, this can be done in $O(m)$ time.

We give an $O(m(p-1))$ time algorithm to find the set of $s$-$t$ paths in a given graph $G$ with at least two $s$-$t$ paths.

  1. We may assume, as above, that every edge $tt'$ incident to $t$ is contained in some $s$-$t$ path and that there exists at least one $s$-$t'$ path in $G-t$.
  2. Check if the number of $s$-$t$ paths in $G-tt'$ is at least two, and if not, let $P_1$ be the set of the unique $s$-$t$ path in $G-tt'$. If there are at least two such paths, we recursively find the set of all such paths. Let $p_1 = |P_1|$. By choice of $tt'$, $p_1 \ge 1$.
  3. Check if the number of $s$-$t'$ paths in $G-t$ is at least two, and if not let $P_2$ be the set of the unique $s$-$t'$ path in $G-t$. Otherwise, we recursively find the set $P_2$ of $s$-$t'$ path in $G-t$. Let $p_2 = |P_2|$, and as above, we again have $p_2 \ge 1$.

Step 1 can be performed in $c'm$ operations for some constant $c'$. The initial check in steps $2$ and $3$ can be performed in $c'(m-1)$ steps. If we must recursively run the algorithm, this will require another $c(m-1)(p_i - 1)$ operations for $i = 1, 2$ in Steps 2 and 3, respectively. As $p_i \ge 1$, we can bound the work in each of Steps 2 and 3 by $c'm + cm(p_i - 1)$. Thus, the total number of operations is at most $3c'm + c(m)(p_1 +p_2 - 2) \le cm(p-1)$ if we choose $c \ge 3c'$.

answered Apr 26 '12 at 21:33

Let $G=(V,E)$ be a graph.

$FindPaths(p,f)$ prints all paths which end in $f$ and can be obtained by adding nodes to path $p$. $p$ is for path, $f$ is for final (node).

Def $FindPaths(p,f)$:
Let $x$ be the last node of $p$.
For each edge $xy$ for some $y$ in $E$
$\ \ \ \ $If $y$ is not in $p$
$\ \ \ \ $$\ \ \ \ $If $y=f$
$\ \ \ \ $$\ \ \ \ $$\ \ \ \ $Print $p-y$
$\ \ \ \ $$\ \ \ \ $Else
$\ \ \ \ $$\ \ \ \ $$\ \ \ \ $$FindPaths(p-y,f)$

If $s$ is the start node and $t$ is the ending node, run $FindPaths(s,t)$.

You can represent path and edges as strings. To check if a node is in a path $p$ you just have to check whether the string contains the character that represents the node. To get the final node of a path use the function to get the last character of a string.

EDIT: My answer is not math research level, but introduction to programming.

answered Apr 27 '12 at 5:53

For shortest paths look at the Wikipedia page of the Floyd–Warshall algorithm

"An algorithm for computing all paths in a graph" by Lars-Erik Thorelli in BIT Numerical Mathematics, July 1966, Volume 6, Issue 4, pp 347-349

answered Mar 19 '10 at 1:42

Since the source and the target are fixed and since there are no weights on edges, the shortest path is best computed by BFS, rather than Roy-Floyd-Warshall. – rgrig Mar 19 '10 at 10:36

If I'm not mistaken, I think an adaptation of a dynamic programming all-pairs-shortest-path algorithm (like the Floyd-Warshall algorithm, considering edge weights of 1) might find all paths. Consider the following scheme to find the total number of all paths leading from u to v (or, in fact, from any start node to any destination):

A matrix $M_1$ is initialized as the adjacency matrix of the graph. That is, $M_1[u,v]$ containes the number of simple paths of length at most 1 from u to v. After that, for all $i$ from 2 to the number of nodes the matrix $M_i$ is updated as follows: $M_i[u,v]$ equals the sum of the entries $M_[u,w]$ for all nodes w adjacent to v. Hence, $M_i[u,v]$ containes the number of simple paths of length at most i from u to v. This scheme runs in time polynomial in the input size, and it can also be modified easily to also store the actual paths in time (and space) polynomial in the output size.

answered Mar 19 '10 at 12:44

A Linear-time Algorithm for Sparsification of Unweighted Graphs

arXiv.org > cs > arXiv:1005.0670 Computer Science > Data Structures and Algorithms Title: A Linear-time Algorithm for Sparsification of Unweighted Graphs

(Submitted on 5 May 2010)

Abstract: Given an undirected graph $G$ and an error parameter $\epsilon > 0$, the <\em graph sparsification> problem requires sampling edges in $G$ and giving the sampled edges appropriate weights to obtain a sparse graph $G_<\epsilon>$ with the following property: the weight of every cut in $G_<\epsilon>$ is within a factor of $(1\pm \epsilon)$ of the weight of the corresponding cut in $G$. If $G$ is unweighted, an $O(m\log n)$-time algorithm for constructing $G_<\epsilon>$ with $O(n\log n/\epsilon^2)$ edges in expectation, and an $O(m)$-time algorithm for constructing $G_<\epsilon>$ with $O(n\log^2 n/\epsilon^2)$ edges in expectation have recently been developed (Hariharan-Panigrahi, 2010). In this paper, we improve these results by giving an $O(m)$-time algorithm for constructing $G_<\epsilon>$ with $O(n\log n/\epsilon^2)$ edges in expectation, for unweighted graphs. Our algorithm is optimal in terms of its time complexity; further, no efficient algorithm is known for constructing a sparser $G_<\epsilon>$. Our algorithm is Monte-Carlo, i.e. it produces the correct output with high probability, as are all efficient graph sparsification algorithms.

Data Structures and Algorithms (cs.DS)

Test Case Generation

Test Case Generation | Set 4 (Random directed / undirected weighted and unweighted Graphs)

Generating Random Directed Unweighted Graphs

  • Since this is a graph, the test data generation plan doesn’t guarantee that a cycle gets formed or not.
  • The number of edges – NUMEDGE is greater than zero and less than NUM*(NUM-1)/2. where NUM = Number of Vertices
  • For each RUN we first print the number of vertices – NUM first in a new separate line and the next NUMEDGE lines are of the form (a b) where a is connected to b and the edge is directed from a to b (a->b)
  • Each of the NUMEDGE lines will have distinct edges, for e.g – if (1, 2) is there in one of the NUMEDGE lines then it is guaranteed, that (1, 2) will not be there in the remaining NUMEDGE-1 lines as this is a directed graph.

Generating Random Directed Weighted Graphs

  • Since this is a graph, the test data generation plan doesn’t guarantee that a cycle gets formed or not.
  • The number of edges – NUMEDGE is greater than zero and less than NUM*(NUM-1)/2. where NUM = Number of Vertices
  • For each RUN we first print the number of vertices – NUM first in a new separate line and the next NUMEDGE lines are of the form (a b wt) where a is connected to b and the edge is directed from a to b (a->b) and the edge has a weight of wt
  • Each of the NUMEDGE lines will have distinct edges, for e.g – if (1, 2) is there in one of the NUMEDGE lines then it is guaranteed, that (1, 2) will not be there in the remaining NUMEDGE-1 lines as this is a directed graph.

Generating Random Undirected Unweighted Graphs

  • Since this is a graph, the test data generation plan doesn’t guarantee that a cycle gets formed or not.
  • The number of edges – NUMEDGE is greater than zero and less than NUM*(NUM-1)/2. where NUM = Number of Vertice s
  • For each RUN we first print the number of vertices – NUM first in a new separate line and the next NUMEDGE lines are of the form (a b) where a is connected to b
  • Each of the NUMEDGE lines will have distinct edges, for e.g – if (1, 2) is there in one of the NUMEDGE lines then it is guaranteed, that (1, 2) and (2, 1) both will not be there in the remaining NUMEDGE-1 lines as this is an undirected graph.

Generating Random Undirected Weighted Graphs

    • Since this is a graph, the test data generation plan doesn’t guarantee that a cycle gets formed or not.
    • The number of edges – NUMEDGE is greater than zero and less than NUM*(NUM-1)/2. where NUM = Number of Vertices
    • For each RUN we first print the number of vertices – NUM first in a new separate line and the next NUMEDGE lines are of the form (a b wt) where a is connected to b and the edge has a weight of wt
    • Each of the NUMEDGE lines will have distinct edges, for e.g – if (1, 2) is there in one of the NUMEDGE lines then it is guaranteed, that (1, 2) and (2, 1) both will not be there in the remaining NUMEDGE-1 lines as this is an undirected graph.

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Related Posts:

The Graph Domain

The Graph Product Line

We offer the following domain as an example to compare and contrast approaches to the definition and implementation of product-line architectures. We believe this a good example, because it deals with a classical domain whose algorithms (i.e. graph algorithms) are common-knowledge to computer scientists. This relieves readers of burden and overhead that accompanies the understanding of an unfamiliar domain. (Also, there are lots of texts that discuss these very algorithms, so obtaining information on the domain should be easy).

In the following paragraphs we describe the family by stating the features -- i.e. algorithms, types of graphs, and searches -- a member could implement. A member of the family implements any valid combination of the following algorithms:

  • Vertex Numbering
  • Connected components
  • Strongly connected components
  • Cycle checking
  • Minimum spanning trees
  • Single-Source Shortest Path

with the following types of graphs:

  • Directed graphs
  • Undirected graphs
  • Weighted graphs
  • Unweighted graphs

Note: we assume that the weights in weighted graphs are always nonnegative and integer.

with the following graph search algorithms:

  • Breadth First Search (BFS)
  • Depth First Search (DFS)

That is, a family member can implement a valid combination of one or more graph algorithms, one directed or undirected graph that is weighted or unweighted, and exactly one search algorithm if required by the graph algorithms combination. For example, a family member could implement < vertex numbering, cycle checking, and strongly connected component> algorithms using an unweighted directed graph and depth-first search.

As in typical product-lines, not all combinations of features are valid. The table below summarizes the constraints for each algorithm. For example the combination of Connected Components and Strongly Connected Components is not valid because it would require that the graph be both directed and undirected at the same time.

Searches that can be used

Graph Types Allowed

* For simplicity we dont consider MST for directed graphs.

For example, if we want a member of our graph product line to implement Vertex Numbering, we could use either directed or undirected graphs, and either weighted or unweighted graphs. However if we want a member to implement Minimum Spanning Trees we are required to use weighted and undirected graphs, and no implementation of DFS or BFS is required. Similarly, to compute Single-Source Shortest Paths the member must implement directed and weighted graphs, and no implementation of DFS or BFS is required.

On Implementation Issues

How you formally represent this domain is up to you and the method that you use. Regarding the implementation, we would appreciate if the resulting code is in Java, because this is the language we have used for our implementations and this would make the comparison more meaningful and accurate.

We provide references to the algorithms we are considering in the following table.

[1] Sections 23.2, 23.3

[1] Section 22.1, 23.2, 23.3

Strongly Connected Components

[1] Section 23.3 using DFS to detect back edges

Minimum Spanning Trees

[1] Section 24.2. Kruskal or Prim Algorithms

Single-Source Shortest Path

[1] Section 25.2. Dijkstra's Algorithm.

Please direct questions to:

References
  1. Introduction to Algorithms. Thomas H. Cormen, Charles E. Leiserson, Ronald L. Rivest. MIT Press, 1990.
  2. Data Structures & Their algorithms. Harry R. Lewis, Larry Denenberg. Harper Collins Publishers, 1991.

Algorithms and Data Structures: Graphs

[CSE2304 ], [FAQ ], [progress ] & [plan ], Bib'. Alg's. C - L.A. Sem'1, 2006, FIT, Monash. au
Instructions. Topics discussed in these lecture notes are examinable unless otherwise indicated. You need to follow instructions, take more notes & draw diagrams especially as [indicated] or as done in lectures, work through examples, and do extra reading. Hyper-links not in [square brackets] are mainly for revision, for further reading, and for lecturers of the subject.

Graphs: Introduction
  • Lists are easiest
  • Trees are harder
  • Graphs are hardest

  • Graphs consist of vertices (nodes) and edges (arcs)
  • can be weighted / un weighted

  • and directed / un directed / directed-a cyclic graphs (DAG)

(also many other special types of graph)

Weighted Undirected Graph

Weighted Directed Graph

  • G = < V, E >, a pair of sets, where
  • V is a set of Vertices

  • E is a set of edges, where

    Un directed Graphs

    (Edge-) Weighted Graphs

    • each edge is a triple <v1. v2. w>, where w is a weight (a number/ length/ time/. etc.)

    [lecturer: derive a graph from some real example; class: take notes!]

    • max number of edges is
    • |V| 2 for a directed graph
  • |V|*(|V|+1)/2 for an undirected graph

    Graph by Adjacency Matrix:

    lloyd/tildeAlgDS/Graph/PICS/Directed.gif" /> read on.

  • [fill in missing bits]
    directed, by adjacency matrix:

    Adjacency Matrices of (Un)weighted graphs, a tricky point:
    • Un weighted graph
  • m[i,j] = some "special" value if vj not adjacent to vi (must suit problem)

    • somtimes use zero (provided it cannot be a weight)
  • sometimes use a big value for "infinity"
  • [fill in missing bits]
    by adjacency lists:
    1: ----> [__, -]-----> nil

    Graph Summary
    • can represent
      • road, & other transport networks
      • electronic circuits, telecommunications networks
      • relationships
  • directed / un directed
  • weighted / un weighted
  • sparse / dense
  • NB. Adjacent (by an edge) and connected (by a path) are not the same thing.
  • Adjacency matrix good for [_____?_____] graphs
  • Adjacency lists good for [_____?_____] graphs
  • Read about: path problems in Graphs.
    2006 © L.Allison. Faculty of Information Technology (Clayton School), Monash University, Australia 3800.