Desmontando A Harry Critical Thinking - Essay for you

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Desmontando A Harry Critical Thinking

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Desmontando A Harry

Desmontando A Harry

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  1. Desmontando a Harry dirigida por Woody Allen. Con Woody Allen, Elisabeth Shue, Robin Williams, Demi Moore, Judy Davis, Kirstie Alley, Amy Irving, Billy Crystal, Julia.
  2. Deconstructing Harry (1997) cast and crew credits, including actors, actresses, directors, writers and more.

Deconstructing Harry; Título: Desmontando a Harry Los secretos de Harry Los enredos de Harry: Ficha técnica; Dirección: Woody Allen; Producción: Jean Doumanian. Ver Deconstructing Harry Película Online Subtitulada, descargar Deconstructing Harry gratis completa subs español, watch Deconstructing Harry full movie online free. Deconstructing Harry is a comedy film written and directed by Woody Allen and released in 1997. This film tells the story of a successful writer named Harry Block. Want to watch this again later? Sign in to add this video to a playlist. escena del infierno.

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DECONSTRUCTING HARRY - Watch Full Movie

DECONSTRUCTING HARRY - Watch Full Movie - 1997

1997 ( US ) · English · Comedy · G · 96 minutes of full movie HD video (uncut).

MOVIE SYNOPSIS - What's the story of this 1997 film?

Deconstructing Harry, full movie - Harry Block, a middle-aged writer with some success, has used often sentimental and family experiences to write his works, which is why most of your friends, relatives and former women hate it. In such circumstances, it is very complex to find someone who wants to accompany him on a trip to his old university to receive a tribute. You can watch Deconstructing Harry online on video-on-demand services (Netflix, HBO Now), pay-TV or movie theaters with original audio in English. This film has been premiered in theaters in 1997 (Movies 1997 ). The DVD and Blu-Ray edition of full movie was sold some time after its official release in theaters.

CAST Deconstructing Harry (1997) MOVIE REVIEW online

Very good, managed to tell a good story and keep the audience in his chair.

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Deconstructing Harry

Deconstructing Harry

Deconstructing Harry is a black comedy film by Woody Allen released in 1997. This film tells the story of a successful writer called Harry Block, played by Allen himself, who draws inspiration from people he knows in real-life, and from events that happened to him, sometimes causing these people to become alienated from him as a result.

The central plot features Block driving to a university from which he was once thrown out, in order to receive an honorary degree. Three passengers accompany him on the journey: a prostitute, a friend, and his son, whom he has kidnapped from his divorced wife. However, there are many flashbacks, segments taken from Block's writing, and interactions with his own fictional characters.

Contents Plot

One night, Lucy (Judy Davis ) gets a taxi to the home of author Harry Block (Woody Allen ). She has just read Harry's latest novel. In the novel, fictional Leslie (Julia Louis-Dreyfus ) is having an affair with her sister's husband Ken (Richard Benjamin ). Lucy is angry because the novel is patently based on her and Harry's own affair. As a result, everyone knows about it. Lucy pulls a gun out of her purse, saying she will kill herself. She then turns the gun on Harry and begins firing. She chases him out onto the roof. Harry insists that he has already been punished: his latest girlfriend Fay (Elisabeth Shue ) has left him for his best friend Larry (Billy Crystal ). To distract Lucy, Harry tells her a story he is currently writing: a semi-autobiographical story of a sex-obsessed young man named Harvey (Tobey Maguire ) who is mistakenly claimed by Death.

In therapy, Harry realizes he has not changed since he was a sex-obsessed youth. Harry discusses the honoring ceremony at his old university, taking place the next day. Harry is miserable that he has nobody to share the occasion with. After the session, Harry asks his ex-wife Joan (Kirstie Alley ) if he can take their son Hilliard (Eric Lloyd ) to the ceremony. She refuses, stating that Harry is a bad influence on Hilliard. She is also furious at Harry for the novel he wrote. In it, the character Epstein (Stanley Tucci ) marries Helen (Demi Moore ), but the marriage begins to crumble after the birth of their son.

Harry runs into an acquaintance, Richard (Bob Balaban ), who is worried about his health. After accompanying Richard to the hospital, Harry asks him to come to the university ceremony. Richard appears uninterested. Harry then goes to meet his ex-girlfriend Fay, who reveals that she is now engaged. Harry begs Fay to get back together with him. He asks Fay to accompany him to his ceremony, but it clashes with Fay's wedding, scheduled the following day.

That night, Harry sleeps with a prostitute, Cookie (Hazelle Goodman). Harry then asks Cookie to accompany him to his ceremony.

In the morning, Richard unexpectedly arrives to join Harry and Cookie on the journey. On a whim, Harry decides to "kidnap" his son Hilliard. Along the way, they stop at a carnival, then at Harry's half-sister Doris's (Caroline Aaron ). Doris, a devoted Jew, is upset by Harry's portrayals of Judaism in his stories, as is her husband (Eric Bogosian ). During the journey, Harry also encounters his fictional creations Ken and Helen, who force him to confront some painful truths about his life. Just before arriving at the university, Richard dies peacefully in the car.

Distressed, Harry literally slides out of focus, becoming blurred like one of his own fictional characters. Cookie helps him restore focus. The university's staffers gush over Harry, asking what he plans to write next. He describes a story about a man (based on himself) who journeys down to Hell to reclaim his true love (based on Fay) from the Devil (based on Larry - both being played by Billy Crystal). Harry and the Devil engage in a verbal duel as to who is truly the most evil of the two. Harry gets as far as arguing that he is a kidnapper before the story is interrupted by the arrival of the police. Harry is arrested for kidnapping Hilliard, for possessing a gun (it was Lucy's), and for having drugs in the car (belonging to Cookie).

Larry and Fay come from their wedding to bail Harry out of jail. Harry reluctantly gives them his blessings. Back at his apartment, a miserable Harry fantasizes that the university's ceremony is taking place. Harry realizes that he cannot function in life. He can only function in art. The film ends with Harry returning to his writing.

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Sioux Falls Public Schools

Examples of people who don’t think critically

Examples of critical thinkers

What does it mean to be educated?

Activated Knowledge
  • Accurate information that can be used to gain more knowledge
  • Principles of critical thinking

    Am I a critical thinker?
    • Stage 1 - Unreflective Thinker
  • Dismiss ideas we don’t agree with

  • Don’t know what we don’t know

  • Stage 2 – Challenged Thinker
    • Strives to analyze thinking
  • Understands how concepts, assumptions, inferences, implications, and points of view form thinking

    • Recognizes the qualities of sound thinking: clarity, accuracy, precision, relevance, logicalness
  • May engage in self-deception: “If everyone would think clearly like me, this would be a fine world.”

  • The Beginning Thinker
    • Checks information for accuracy and relevance
  • Recognizes assumptions guiding inferences

  • Identifies prejudicial and biased beliefs, unjustifiable conclusions, misused words, and missed implications

  • Analyzes the logic of situations and problems

  • Expresses clear and precise questions

  • Deconstructing Harry

    WIKIPEDIA ARTICLE

    Deconstructing Harry is a 1997 comedy film written and directed by Woody Allen. This film tells the story of a successful writer named Harry Block, played by Allen, who draws inspiration from people he knows in real life, and from events that happened to him, sometimes causing these people to become alienated from him as a result.

    The central plot features Block driving to a university from which he was once thrown out, in order to receive an honorary degree. Three passengers accompany him on the journey: a prostitute, a friend, and his son, whom he has kidnapped from his ex-wife. However, there are many flashbacks, segments taken from Block's writing, and interactions with his own fictional characters.

    Contents Plot [ edit ]

    One night, Lucy (Judy Davis ) gets a taxi to the home of author Harry Block (Woody Allen ). She has just read Harry's latest novel. In the novel, the character Leslie (Julia Louis-Dreyfus ) is having an affair with her sister's husband Ken (Richard Benjamin ). Lucy is angry because the novel is patently based on her and Harry's own affair; as a result, everyone knows about it. Lucy pulls a gun out of her purse, saying she will kill herself. She then turns the gun on Harry and begins firing. She chases him out onto the roof. Harry insists that he has already been punished: his latest girlfriend Fay (Elisabeth Shue ) has left him for his best friend Larry (Billy Crystal ). To distract Lucy, Harry tells her a story he is currently writing: a semi-autobiographical story of a sex-obsessed young man named Harvey (Tobey Maguire ) who is mistakenly claimed by Death.

    In therapy, Harry realizes he has not changed since he was a sex-obsessed youth. Harry discusses the honoring ceremony at his old university, taking place the next day; he is particularly unhappy that he has nobody to share the occasion with. After the session, Harry asks his ex-wife Joan (Kirstie Alley ) if he can take their son Hilliard (Eric Lloyd ) to the ceremony. She refuses, stating that Harry is a bad influence on Hilliard. She is also furious at Harry for the novel he wrote. In it, the character Epstein (Stanley Tucci ) marries Helen (Demi Moore ), but the marriage begins to crumble after the birth of their son.

    Harry runs into an acquaintance, Richard (Bob Balaban ), who is worried about his health. After accompanying Richard to the hospital, Harry asks him to come to the university ceremony. Richard appears uninterested. Harry then goes to meet his ex-girlfriend Fay, who reveals that she is now engaged. Harry begs Fay to get back together with him. He asks Fay to accompany him to his ceremony, but it clashes with Fay's wedding, scheduled the following day.

    That night, Harry sleeps with a prostitute, Cookie (Hazelle Goodman ). Harry then asks Cookie to accompany him to his ceremony.

    In the morning, Richard unexpectedly arrives to join Harry and Cookie on the journey. On a whim, Harry decides to "kidnap" his son Hilliard. Along the way, they stop at a carnival, then at Harry's half-sister Doris's (Caroline Aaron ). Doris, a devoted Jew. is upset by Harry's portrayals of Judaism in his stories, as is her husband (Eric Bogosian ). During the journey, Harry also encounters his fictional creations Ken and Helen, who force him to confront some painful truths about his life. Just before arriving at the university, Richard dies peacefully in the car.

    Distressed, Harry literally slides out of focus, becoming blurred like one of his own fictional characters. Cookie helps him restore focus. The university's staffers gush over Harry, asking what he plans to write next. He describes a story about a man (based on himself) who journeys down to Hell to reclaim his true love (based on Fay) from the Devil (based on Larry - both being played by Billy Crystal). Harry and the Devil engage in a verbal duel as to who is truly the most evil of the two. Harry gets as far as arguing that he is a kidnapper before the story is interrupted by the arrival of the police. Harry is arrested for kidnapping Hilliard, for possessing a gun (it was Lucy's), and for having drugs in the car (belonging to Cookie).

    Larry and Fay come from their wedding to bail Harry out of jail. Harry reluctantly gives them his blessings. Back at his apartment, a miserable Harry fantasizes that the university's ceremony is taking place. Harry realizes that he can only function in art, not in life. The film ends with Harry returning to his writing.

    Cast [ edit ] Awards and nominations [ edit ] Influences [ edit ]

    The film is a general reworking of his earlier 1980 film Stardust Memories . which also had an artist go to a ceremony in his honor, while reminiscing over past relationships and trying to fix and stabilize current ones. [1]

    Allen is an admirer of several European directors whose primary body of work was completed sometimes decades before his first script, and his films in particular often draw upon the works of Ingmar Bergman and Federico Fellini. The rough outline of the plot of Deconstructing Harry. that of an academic on a long drive to receive an honorary award from his old university while reflecting upon his life's experiences, essentially mirrors that of Bergman's Wild Strawberries . [2] Also, the film is similar to Fellini's . in that it is about an artist struggling with his current relationships and remembering his old ones, interspersed with dream sequences, as well as his work being based on events from his life.

    It is acknowledged by some critics that Allen based the name of Harry Block on Antonius Block (Max von Sydow ), the protagonist from Bergman's The Seventh Seal . [1] Some critics, including Roger Ebert. have suggested that the character of Harry Block is based on real-life author Philip Roth and not on Allen himself. [2]

    References [ edit ] External links [ edit ]

    ERIC - Search Results

    Eaton, Sarah Elaine – Online Submission, 2012

    This guidebook for teachers documents the "Harry Potter in Translation" project undertaken at the Language Research Centre at the University of Calgary. The guide also offers 5 sample lesson plans for teachers of grades three to twelve for teaching world languages using the Harry Potter books in translation to engage students. (Contains a…

    Descriptors: Childrens Literature, Books, Translation, Lesson Plans

    Johnson, Melissa C. – CEA Forum, 2015

    This essay is grounded in the scholarship of teaching and learning and will focus specifically on the ways in which the Harry Potter books highlight the diversity of learning and teaching styles; privilege active experiential learning and problem solving over passive rote learning; and emphasize the benefits of collaboration over competition.…

    Descriptors: Literature, Books, Fiction, Teaching Styles

    Deets, Stephen – PS: Political Science and Politics, 2009

    This article describes teaching a course called Harry Potter and Politics. Focusing on aspects of political culture, the class tackled themes of identity, institutional behavior, and globalization. Teaching Harry Potter has several benefits. Students are both familiar with the wizarding world and yet have enough distance to examine it…

    Descriptors: Popular Culture, Global Approach, Novels, Conflict

    Dempster, Steve; Oliver, Alice; Sunderland, Jane; Thistlethwaite, Joanne – Children's Literature in Education, 2016

    This article reports findings from a small-scale focus-group study funded by the British Academy. Drawing on Herbert Marsh and Richard Shavelson's notion of "Academic Self-Concept" and David Barton and Mary Hamilton's view of literacy as context-specific social practices, the authors examine what young British "Harry Potter"…

    Descriptors: Childrens Literature, Didacticism, Focus Groups, Reading Habits

    Winters, Sarah Fiona – Children's Literature in Education, 2013

    This article argues that Harry Potter fan vids can be used in the classroom as works of secondary criticism about J. K. Rowling's primary text. It makes two claims: the first is that vids can be read as criticism of a particular text (in this case Harry Potter) alongside other critical essays on that text; the second is that the practice of…

    Descriptors: Scholarship, Teaching Methods, English Instruction, English Literature

    Yager, Susan – Honors in Practice, 2015

    Years after the publication of its seventh and final volume in 2007 and the completion of the film series in 2011, the "Harry Potter" series is still studied and cited by professionals in fields ranging from science and economics to law and theology (for recent examples see Gierzynski and Eddy; Reagin; Bassham). Its continuing popularity…

    Descriptors: Honors Curriculum, Play, Novels, Fiction

    Wolosky, Shira – Children's Literature in Education, 2014

    The formative power of children's literature is both great and suspicious. As a resource of socialization, the construction and experience of children's literature can be seen as modes of disciplinary coercion such as Michel Foucault has anatomized. "Harry Potter", as a "craze" phenomenon, has attracted particular…

    Descriptors: Discipline, Childrens Literature, Self Concept, Socialization

    Mills, Alice – Children's Literature in Education, 2010

    This article considers limitations on agency for characters in the Harry Potter novels, in particular, how far they are driven by an addictive yearning for their beloved dead. As well as Harry's yearning for his dead parents, Dumbledore's guilt, Snape's longing and Slughorn's craving can be read as evidence of addiction rather than love, while the…

    Descriptors: Childrens Literature, Substance Abuse, Anxiety, Novels

    Ruwe, Donelle – English Journal, 2013

    The American edition of "Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone" has significant changes from the original British version, and every word of a Harry Potter book in translation derives from a translator's decision-making process. Focusing students on British-to-American cultural translation problems in the Harry Potter series…

    Descriptors: Translation, North American English, Language Usage, Cultural Differences

    Hall, Jordana – Children's Literature in Education, 2011

    In "Rabelais and His World" Mikhail Bakhtin traces the history of laughter and the specific impact of Francois Rabelais upon that history, but more important it is the most definitive example of the carnivalesque available to Western scholars to date. By carnivalesque he refers to the traditional language and spectacle associated with folk culture…

    Descriptors: Race, Freedom, Folk Culture, Racial Differences

    Faricy-Beredo, Bridget – Public Services Quarterly, 2013

    Libraries are constantly challenged to find ways to demonstrate their value to their institutions. Can hosting a National Library of Medicine (NLM) exhibition increase a library's impact? In 2012 the University of Toledo engaged their constituents by hosting and developing programming for the NLM exhibit Harry Potter's World: Renaissance Science,…

    Descriptors: Government Libraries, Medical Libraries, Exhibits, Academic Libraries

    Gelman, Susan A.; Frazier, Brandy N.; Noles, Nicholaus S.; Manczak, Erika M.; Stilwell, Sarah M. – Journal of Cognition and Development, 2015

    Adults attach special value to objects that link to notable people or events--authentic objects. We examined children's monetary evaluation of authentic objects, focusing on four kinds: celebrity possessions (e.g. Harry Potter's glasses), original creations (e.g. the very first teddy bear), personal possessions (e.g. your…

    Descriptors: Age Differences, Adults, Children, Attachment Behavior

    Messinger, Adam M. – Teaching Sociology, 2012

    Content analysis is a valuable research tool for social scientists that unfortunately can prove challenging to teach to undergraduate students. Published classroom exercises designed to teach content analysis have thus far been predominantly envisioned as lengthy projects for upper-level courses. A brief and engaging exercise may be more…

    Descriptors: Content Analysis, Teaching Methods, Questionnaires, Pretests Posttests

    McShea, Betsy; Vogel, Judith; Yarnevich, Maureen – Mathematics Teaching in the Middle School, 2005

    This article illustrates how teachers can use the Harry Potter book series to teach linear modeling and probability to their students. (Contains 2 tables and 4 figures.)

    Descriptors: Probability, Adolescent Literature, Childrens Literature, Mathematics Instruction

    Witschonke, Christopher – Middle School Journal (J3), 2006

    This article deals with the use of alternative texts, such as the Harry Potter book series in classroom teaching. In this article, the author discusses a wide range of themes that could be addressed in the classroom. Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone deals with issues of greed, self-sacrifice, fear of the unknown, and self-confidence. Harry…

    Descriptors: Nontraditional Education, Critical Reading, History Instruction, Student Attitudes

    By Svetlana Yunyova

    German Harry by William Somerset Maugham

    William Somerset Maugham was an outstanding British novelist, playwright and short-story writer. Somerset Maugham was born in Paris and he spoke French as his mother tongue. In 1897 he graduated from St. Thomas’ medical school but abandoned medicine after the success of his first novels and plays. His first novel was Liza of Lambeth. which drew on his experiences of attending women in childbirth. His first play, A Man of Honour. was produced in 1903. Maugham’s breakthrough novel was the semi-autobiographical Of Human Bondage (1915), which is usually considered his outstanding achievement. During World War I Maugham was in the British Intelligence Service. His work there is described in a collection of short stories under the title of Ashenden, or the British Agent. published in 1928. Maugham’s other works include the plays Rain, The Circle, Our Betters, The Constant Wife, novels The Moon and the Sixpence, Cakes and Ale, The Razor’s Edge and many others. Maugham collected his literary experiences in The Summing Up (1938), which has been used as a guidebook for creative writing. Maugham’s skill in handling plot has been compared by critics in the manner of Guy de Maupassant. In many novels the surroundings are international and the stories are told in clear, economical, exact and expressive style with cynical or resigned undertone. In his literary works Maugham gave a realistic picture of the English bourgeois society – its egoism and false democracy. Yet he never tried to tackle a root problem, to look into the very heart of the matter, of the situation that he could describe so skillfully. Maugham once said, “Most people cannot see anything, but I can see what is in front of my nose with extreme clearness; the greatest writers can see through a brick wall. My vision is not so penetrating.” Maugham died in Nice on December 16, 1965.

    I was in Thursday Island and I wanted very much to go to New Guinea. Now the only way in which I could do this was by getting a pearling lugger to take me across the Arafura Sea. The pearl fishery at that time was in a bad way and a flock of neat little craft lay anchored in the harbour. I found a skipper with nothing much to do (the journey to Merauke and back could hardly take him less than a month) and with him I made the necessary arrangements. He engaged four Torres Straits islanders as crew (the boat was but nineteen tons) and we ransacked the local store for canned goods. A day or two before I sailed a man who owned a number of pearlers came to me and asked whether on my way I would stop at the island of Trebucket and leave a sack of flour, another of rice, and some magazines for the hermit who lived there.

    I pricked up my ears. It appeared that the hermit had lived by himself on this remote and tiny island for thirty years, and when opportunity occurred provisions were sent to him by kindly souls. He said that he was a Dane, but in the Torres Straits he was known as German Harry. His history went back a long way. Thirty years before, he had been an able seaman on a sailing vessel that was wrecked in those treacherous waters. Two boats managed to get away and eventually hit upon the desert island of Trebucket. This is well out of the line of traffic and it was three years before any ship sighted the castaways. Sixteen men had landed on the island, but when at last a schooner, driven from her course by stress of weather, put in for shelter, no more than five were left. When the storm abated the skipper took four of these on board and eventually landed them at Sydney. German Harry refused to go with them. He said that during those three years he had seen such terrible things that he had a horror of his fellow-men and wished never to live with them again. He would say no more. He was absolutely fixed in his determination to stay, entirely by himself, in that lonely place. Though now and then opportunity had been given him to leave he had never taken it.

    A strange man and a strange story. I learned more about him as we sailed across the desolate sea. The Torres Straits are peppered with islands and at night we anchored on the lee of one or other of them. Of late new pearling grounds have been discovered near Trebucket and in the autumn pearlers, visiting it now and then, have given German Harry various necessities so that he has been able to make himself sufficiently comfortable. They bring him papers, bags of flour and rice, and canned meats. He has a whale boat and used to go fishing in it, but now he is no longer strong enough to manage its unwieldy bulk. There is abundant pearl shell on the reef that surrounds his island and this he used to collect and sell to the pearlers for tobacco, and sometimes he found a good pearl for which he got a considerable sum. It is believed that he has, hidden away somewhere, a collection of magnificent pearls. During the war no pearlers came out and for years he never saw a living soul. For all he knew, a terrible epidemic had killed off the entire human race and he was the only man alive. He was asked later what he thought.

    “I thought something had happened,” he said.

    He ran out of matches and was afraid that his fire would go out, so he only slept in snatches, putting wood on his fire from time to time all day and all night. He came to the end of his provisions and lived on chickens, fish and coconuts. Sometimes he got a turtle.

    During the last four months of the year there may be two or three pearlers about and not infrequently after the day’s work they will row in and spend an evening with him. They try to make him drunk and then they ask him what happened during those three years after the two boat-loads came to the island. How was it that sixteen landed and at the end of that time only five were left? He never says a word. Drunk or sober he is equally silent on that subject and if they insist grows angry and leaves them.

    I forget if it was four or five days before we sighted the hermit’s little kingdom. We had been driven by bad weather to take shelter and had spent a couple of days at an island on the way. Trebucket is a low island, perhaps a mile round, covered with coconuts, just raised above the level of the sea and surrounded by a reef so that it can be approached only on one side. There is no opening in the reef and the lugger had to anchor a mile from the shore. We got into a dinghy with the provisions. It was a stiff pull and even within the reef the sea was choppy. I saw the little hut, sheltered by trees, in which German Harry lived, and as we approached he sauntered down slowly to the water’s edge. We shouted a greeting, but he did not answer. He was a man of over seventy, very bald, hatchet-faced, with a grey beard, and he walked with a roll so that you could never have taken him for anything but a sea-faring man. His sunburn made his blue eyes look very pale and they were surrounded by wrinkles as though for long years he had spent interminable hours scanning the vacant sea. He wore dungarees and a singlet, patched, but neat and clean. The house to which he presently led us consisted of a single room with a roof of corrugated iron. There was a bed in it, some rough stools which he himself had made, a table, and his various household utensils. Under a tree in front of it was a table and a bench. Behind was an enclosed run for his chickens.

    I cannot say that he was pleased to see us. He accepted our gifts as a right, without thanks, and grumbled a little because something or other he needed had not been brought. He was silent and morose. He was not interested in the news we had to give him, for the outside world was no concern of his: the only thing he cared about was his island. He looked upon it with a jealous, proprietary right; he called it “my health resort” and he feared that the coconuts that covered it would tempt some enterprising trader. He looked at me with suspicion. He was sombrely curious to know what I was doing in these seas. He used words with difficulty, talking to himself rather than to us, and it was a little uncanny to hear him mumble away as though we were not there. But he was moved when my skipper told him that an old man of his own age whom he had known for a long time was dead.

    “Old Charlie dead – that’s too bad. Old Charlie dead.”

    He repeated it over and over again. I asked him if he read.

    “Not much,” – he answered indifferently.

    He seemed to be occupied with nothing but his food, his dogs and his chickens. If what they tell us in books were true his long communion with nature and the sea should have taught him many subtle secrets. It hadn’t. He was a savage. He was nothing but a narrow, ignorant and cantankerous seafaring man. As I looked at the wrinkled, mean old face I wondered what was the story of those three dreadful years that had made him welcome this long imprisonment. I sought to see behind those pale blue eyes of his what secrets they were that he would carry to his grave. And then I foresaw the end. One day a pearl fisher would land on the island and German Harry would not be waiting for him, silent and suspicious, at the water’s edge. He would go up to the hut and there, lying on the bed, unrecognisable, he would see all that remained of what had once been a man. Perhaps then he would hunt high and low for the great mass of pearls that has haunted the fancy of so many adventurers. But I do not believe he would find it: German Harry would have seen to it that none should discover the treasure, and the pearls would rot in their hiding place. Then the pearl fisher would go back into his dinghy and the island once more be deserted of man.

    Papua New Guinea – a country in the southwest Pacific Ocean, north of Australia, which includes the eastern half of the island of New Guinea and various small islands.

    Sydney – the largest city in Australia, which is the capital of the state of New South Wales and an important financial, industrial and educational centre.

    ACTIVITIES AND EXERCISES

    1. Translate the following word combinations into Russian. Describe the situations in which they were used.

    • to lie anchored

    • to get a considerable sum

    • to make the necessary arrangements

    • to run out of matches

    Harry Potter and the Cursed Child is warm, witty, and wildly inventive

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