Computer Networks Homework 1 - Essay for you

Essay for you

Computer Networks Homework 1

Rating: 4.2/5.0 (11 Votes)

Category: Homework

Description

High Speed Network Homework 1 - Term Paper

High Speed Network Homework 1

HW1 1. From dial-up modem to ISDN, the occupied band in the frequency domain increases by 20 times (4kHz  80 kHz), however, the bandwidth (bit rate) increases only from 56 kb/s to 128 kb/s. Briefly explain why the latter is not proportional to the former. ANS: We can tell the relationship between bandwidth and Channel capacity is not linear(proportional) relationship by examining the Shannon–Hartley theorem-

where capital C means Channel capacity and capital W means
bandwidth.

2. Explain if ring topology is a good choice for WANs. ANS:

WAN is a computer networking technology used to transmit data over long distances, and between different LANs, MANs. Thus, at first glance, we can say ring topology may NOT be a good choice for WAN because of the following reasons:  The communication delay of ring topology is directly proportional to number of nodes in the network. It will result in serious delay if ring topology is being chosen to implement large networks such as WAN. Moving, adding and changing the devices (or even one malfunctioning device) in ring topology can affect the whole network. Especially in the large network such as WAN, there are hundreds of thousands of routers may be under maintenance. If one or more alternate devices are not being used to replace the original one, the whole network may be shut down. Bandwidth is shared between devices, which will result in low channel capacity if the ring topology is being used in case like WAN.

However, there are ring protection methods such as line and path switched rings. These topologies evolved from telephony networks as an essential part of the SONET standard. Nodes on a switched ring monitor the health of optical transmission and in the event of a failure or cable break, switch a loop-back around the problem, limiting the damage. But switched rings lose steam after one failure. In.

Other articles

CMPSCI 653 Homework 2

CMPSCI 653: Computer Networks
Homework 1: Network Layer and Transport Layer
Web posted: Mar 23, 19:00 Due: March 30, 17:00
VIP/NTU Students: Due one week from when you receive the assignment or view Lecture 15 whichever is later.
  1. Distance Vector Routing
    Chapter 4, Problem 6 from the Ross Kurose text book (page 317).
    Online version is here (look at the Problems section, not the review questions).
  • Multicast routing
    Consider the two basic approaches identified toward achieving multicast: unicast emulation and network-layer-multicast. Consider a sender and 32 receivers. Suppose that the sender is connected to the receiver through a binary tree of routers. What is the cost of sending a multicast packet, in the case of unicast emulation and network-layer multicast, for this topology? Assume that every time a packet (or a copy of the packet) traverses a link, it incurs a cost C. What topology for interconnecting the senders, receivers, and routers will bring the cost of unicast emulation and network-layer multicast as far apart as possible? You can choose as many routers as you like.

  • Congestion Control
    As a possible congestion control mechanism in a subnet using virtual circuits internally, a router could refrain from acknowledging a packet until (i) it knows its last transmission along the virtual circuit was received successfully, and (ii) it has a free buffer. For simplicity, assume that the routers use a stop-and-wait protocol and a that each virtual circuit has one buffer dedicated to it for each direction of traffic. If it takes T seconds to transmit a packet (data or acks) and there are n routers on the path, what is the rate at which packets are delivered to the destination host? Assume that transmission errors are rare, and the host router connection is infinitely fast.

  • UDP
    Why does UDP exist? Would it not have been sufficient to let applications send raw IP packets?

  • TCP
    Consider the idealized model for the steady-state dynamics of TCP: the average throughput of a connection in the period where the congestion window varies from (W*MSS)/2 to W*MSS is (0.75 * W * MSS)/RTT. In this scenario, assume that only one packet is lost at the very end of each period. Show that the loss rate is equal to L = 1/[ 3/8 * W*W + 3W/4]
  • Prashant Shenoy Last modified: Wed Mar 29 10:07:26 EST 2000

    Principles of Computer Networks and Communications 1e homework solutions

    Principles of Computer Networks and Communications 1e homework solutions

    In order to get test bank and solutions manual for

    Principles of Computer Networks and Communications 1st Edition Barry Dumas Morris Schwartz,

    please contact sales@lostinthedark.net for samples and payment instructions.

    Usually when individuals contemplate checking out book, they think of battling with your examination. The fact is that these concepts could be polar opposites. Given you are wanting to finishing your test, there could possibly be a number of actions you must make in an effort to reach your calls.

    Despite just how much you gear up to review textbook, it ‘s unassailable that resting late during the night is a need immediately. That is why it makes total feeling to engage in resting late during the night currently, before you get involved in the intestines of exactly what you should make take place.

    Principles of Computer Networks and Communications 1st Edition Barry Dumas Morris Schwartz test bank

    Scheduling time to review is so vital due to the fact that without doing that, you might get incapable. That might result in coming to be unable to review book. There are definitely certain virtues that individuals should have in an attempt to study program product. Any person with these virtues will certainly already set up time to review on a regular basis.

    The trick to doing well with checking out textbook is dependent on being regular, yet bunches of people do not comprehend simply exactly how essential that really is! By corresponding. you can make certain that you ‘re furnished to check out textbook.

    Principles of Computer Networks and Communications 1st Edition Barry Dumas Morris Schwartz solutions manual

    Despite the fact that we could possibly help you consider studying program product, you initially have to make certain that checking out book is ideal for you. Examining training course product is not indicated for merely any person, as well as you need to think of that prior to case.

    The easiest means to make the analysis is to ask yourself these questions:.

    Are you identified to finish the program?

    Do you wish to do much better in every program?

    Do you would like to pass your exam without experiencing any sort of difficulties?

    Expectantly, your solution to each one of the inquiries was “yes “. Those selections are normal between people who read book. You have actually swiftly taken the primary step in the direction of reviewing textbook!

    Viewing that you recognize that you are in the appropriate frame of mind to check out book, we will examine certain initial practices that somebody book book will certainly already be doing. Because that might make preparing to check out textbook less complicated, utilize this opportunity to consist of these particular practices into your decisions.

    Principles of Computer Networks and Communications 1st Edition test bank and solutions manual

    Reading book takes lots of effort spent with time. You will view, the best means to be outfitted for checking out book is to give yourself an ideal quantity of time for the training so you can thrive. Do this, and also checking out book would certainly be a lot easier.

    Checking out textbook Principles of Computer Networks and Communications 1e homework solutions is an ambition which lots of will have in life, due to the fact that this is the hardest obstacle that any person could experience. And also because of this, a great deal of individuals that determine to study program material gave up prior to they even begin.

    Reviewing textbook is not just a short lived diversion, or like having problem with your exam. To be geared up, you certainly have to be perseverant, independent, and also clever. Then you easily examine course product.

    You have formerly asked on your own: “Are you established to finish the program? ” Fairly, you need to ask this to yourself. People that claimed “no ” to this will certainly be helpless to take any type of activity to review textbook.

    Likewise be sure you have the will to succeed that checking out book would take. Are you figured out to finish the course? There would certainly be a start difference between believing something is an useful concept and really doing it. Without a question, you require a lot of discipline to hang on.

    That ‘s amazing for being the form of character that starts. It is practical that folks that tried to read textbook Principles of Computer Networks and Communications 1st Edition homework solutionsand also dropped short more than likely did not completely ready. By going over the initial concerns to determine if you might be an ideal person to check out textbook, you are now knowledgeable about exactly what is suggested to succeed.

    You will locate something mutually shared among those which have actually done well if you check out others that have actually done well in checking out textbook either recently or long back. They recognized exactly what was suggested just before starting, and also they recognized just what kind of character is driven to do well. When you discover what type of character is needed to read book, there is nobody that stands in the path in between you and your triumph!

    Checking out textbook has a bodily top quality to it. Any sort of action that you preparation in advance of time will certainly end with a favorable result. You ‘ll discover the power of your mind will deliver you upto your success.

    Every time your mind tells you that reading book is unfeasible, merely maintain in mind that a person who is being regular will certainly eliminate the negativity and maintain their ideas on success. Allow ‘s explore what is required to educate since our thoughts are where we need it to be!

    While you study training course product for 3 months, you might locate that checking out textbook is influencing various other areas of your day. Checking out book is a significant way of living option that shapes you in bunches of ways.

    While you ‘re picking the textbook, buying the textbook or examining the textbook Principles of Computer Networks and Communications 1e Barry Dumas Morris Schwartz homework solutions, you might merely be looking to achieve basic improvement. With concentrating on the way of living, it will end up being crystal clear and also you could see just what book book actually implies to you. If you learn the results of reviewing book, you could come to understand that the results are actually exactly what you are trying to do.

    Moreover, someone requires to be independent. That is not merely a feature that is essential to review textbook, but also with various other locations of life.

    Reviewing book is greater than having problem with your examination. It is a lifestyle choice in many ways. Anytime you view it this means, you might realize the various benefits in day-to-day life. Inevitably, it requires a special virtue to complete the basic objective. It is useful to allow those perks to alter your life all around.

    The ideal thing concerning checking out book is the perseverant quality that is required to succeed which might make its way into all locations of life. It is simply one of the significant factors of checking out book.

    The key to being successful with checking out book is reliant on being regular, yet great deals of people do not understand merely exactly how important that really is! You will certainly view, the best means to be outfitted for checking out book is to offer yourself an ideal amount of time for the training so you could flourish. Experts that said “no ” to this will be powerless to take any action to read textbook test bank .

    While you ‘re deciding on the book, purchasing the book or studying the textbook Principles of Computer Networks and Communications 1st Edition Barry Dumas Morris Schwartz homework solutions, you could possibly merely be looking to achieve general betterment. The best factor regarding reviewing textbook is the perseverant top quality that is needed to prosper which might make its means into all areas of life.

    PPT - Computer Networks: Homework 1 PowerPoint Presentation

    Computer Networks: Homework 1 PowerPoint PPT Presentation Download Presentation

    Computer Networks: Homework 1

    An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

    Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author. While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.

    Presentation Transcript

    Computer Networks: Homework 1

    Computer Networks: Homework 1

    Computer Networks: Homework 1
    • Each STS-n frame carries (9 × n × 86) bytes of bytes. SONET sends 8000 frames in each second. We can then calculate the user data rate as follows:

    STS-3 → 8000 × (9 × 3 × 86) × 8 = 148.608 Mbps

    STS-9 → 8000 × (9 × 9 × 86) × 8 = 445.824 Mbps

    STS-12 → 8000 × (9 × 12 × 86) × 8 = 594.432 Mbps

    • The user data rate of STS-1 is (8000 × 9 × 86 × 8) = 49.536 Mbps. To carry a load with a data rate 49.526, we need 10 kbps worth of dummy data. This means that we need 10000 / 8 = 750 bytes of dummy data in 8000 frames. In other words, 750 out of every 8000frames need to allow the next byte after H3 to be empty (dummy). For example, we can have sequences of 32 frames in which the first three frames are underloaded and the next 29 are normal.

    Computer Networks: Homework 1
    • The address field in Frame Relay is 16 bits. The address given is only 15 bits. It is not valid.

    Computer Networks: Homework 1

    a. Class C (first byte is between 192 and 223)

    b. Class D (first byte is between 224 and 239)

    c. Class A (first byte is between 0 and 127)

    d. Class B (first byte is between 128 and 191)

    a.netid: 114 hostid: 34.2.8

    b.netid: 132.56 hostid: 8.6

    c.netid: 208.34.54 hostid: 12

    Computer Networks: Homework 1
    • The total number of addresses in this block is 232-16 = 65536. The ISP can divide this large block in several ways depending on the predicted needs of its customers in the future. We assume that the future needs follow the present pattern. In other words, we assume that the ISP will have customers that belong to one of the present groups. We design four ranges: group 1, group 2, group 3, and one reserved range of addresses as shown in Figure.

    Computer Networks: Homework 1
    • Problem 26 (Cont’d)

    In the first group, we have 200 businesses. We augment this number to 256 (the next number after 200 that is a power of 2) to let 56 more customers of this kind in the future. The total number of addresses is 256 × 128 = 32768. For this group, each customer needs 128 addresses. This means the suffix length is log2128 = 7. The prefix length is then 32 − 7 = 25. The addresses are:

    1st customer: 150.80.0.0/25 to 150.80.0.127/25

    2nd customer: 150.80.0.128/25 to 150.80.0.255/25. 200th customer: 150.80.99.128/25 to 150.80.99.255/25

    Unused addresses 150.80.100.0 to 150.80.127.255

    Total Addresses in group 1 = 256 × 128 = 32768 Used = 200 × 128 = 25600.

    Reserved: 7168, which can be assigned to 56 businesses of this size.

    In the second group, we have 400 business. We augment this number to 512 (the next number after 400 that is a power of 2) to let 112 more customer of this kind in the future. The total number of addresses is = 512 × 16 = 8192. For this group, each customer needs 16 addresses. This means the suffix length is 4 log216 = 4.

    The prefix length is then 32 − 4 = 28. The addresses are:

    1st customer: 150.80.128.0/28 to 150.80.128.15/28

    2nd customer: 150.80.128.16/28 to 150.80.128.31/28. 400th customer: 150.80.152.240/28 to 150.80.152.255/28

    Unused addresses 150.80.153.0 to 150.80.159.255

    Total Addresses in group 2 = 512 × 16 = 8192 Used = 400 × 16 = 6400

    Reserved: 1792, which can be assigned to 112 businesses of this size.

    Computer Networks: Homework 1
    • Problem 26 (Cont’d)

    In the third group, we have 2000 households. We augment this number to 2048 (the next number after 2000 that is a power of 2) to let 48 more customer of this kind in the future. The total number of addresses is = 2048 × 4 = 8192. For this group, each customer needs 4 addresses. This means the suffix length is 2 log24 = 2. The prefix length is then 32 − 2 = 30. The addresses are:

    1st customer: 150.80.160.0/30 to 150.80.160.3/30

    2nd customer: 150.80.160.4/30 to 150.80.160.7/30. 2000th customer: 150.80.191.60/30 to 150.80.191.63/30

    Unused addresses 150.80.191.64 to 150.80.191.255

    Total Addresses in group 3 = 2048 × 4 = 8192 Used = 2000 × 4 = 8000

    Reserved: 192, which can be assigned to 48 households.

    In the reserved range, we have 16384 address that are totally unused.

    Note that we have unused addresses in each group and a large range of unused addresses in the reserved range.

    The following shows the summary of used and unused addresses:

    Computer Networks: Homework 1
    • Each customer has only 1 address and, therefore, only one device. Since we defined a network as 2 or more connected devices, this is not a network

    Homework Assignments - Computer Networks

    Homework Assignments
    • Due Wed 1/27:
      • read all of chapter 1. Be prepared to discuss questions 4, 6, 7, 11, 27, 28, 32, 36, 37
      • setup arch1 virtual machine on your laptop (the VM image was updated in Jan 2016)
    • Due Mon 2/1:
      • Read ch1-ch5 of Beej
      • Understand, compile, and test program "showip.c" from Chapter 5.
    • Due Wed 2/3
      • Read 2->2.3 of Peterson (links)
    • Due Mon 2/8
      • Read Peterson 2.5->2.5.2, 2.6, 2.7.
    • Due Wed 2/10:
      • Python tutorial through page 5: https://docs.python.org/2/tutorial/appetite.html
    • Due Mon 2/15:
      • encapsulation lab due yesterday
      • Read peterson
        • 3 through 3.1.2 (switching)
        • 3.2 (IP addressing)
        • 3.3 (routing)
    • Due Mon 2/22:
      • Revised encapsulation lab due yesterday.
      • Questions from chapter 3: 38,43,44,49,55, 56
    • Due Mon 2/29
      • Read chapter 4 except section 4.2
      • Questions from chapter 4: 5,6,8,9,11,20,25,26,27
      • Lab2, part 1 due yesterday
    • Due Mon 3/14
      • Lab 2 Part 2 due yesterday let us know if it was ready "on time" (for extra credit)
    • Due Wed 3/16
      • Read chapter 5 through 5.2.6
    • Due Mon 3/21
      • Lab 2 Part 2 extended with analysis due yesterday
      • Also: midterm today!
    • Due Mon 3/28
      • Lab 2 Part 3 due yesterday
    • (Friday 4/1 is the last day to drop classes)
    • Due Mon 3/4:
      • read: 2-generals (short). and relate it to the protocol for managing TCP state (from idle, though established. ). Big idea: there is no prefect solution (this is a theoretical limitation), and protocols need to recognize and deal with failure to negotiate successfully rather than actually failing.
      • think about: state transition and ladder (short) diagrams (in the context of our class on wed): What does each express? What do they not? Are they both needed? When is either appropriate?
      • from: 2131: DHCP. you should carefully read the following sections (ok to skim or skip the rest)
        • Summary: part 1.0 (the main part of the introduction, stop at 1.1, 2pp)
        • Goals: part 1.6 (1pp)
        • Dynamic allocation of network addresses: part 2.2 (1pp)
        • Client-server interaction: part 3.1 (8pp)
    • Due Wed 3/6
      • read: Routing-Update Algorithms (18pp). Think about
        • how this problem is related to floyd-warshall's solution to the all-pairs shortest path problem (which you saw in cs2302/data structures).
        • In particular, why do distance-vector protocols take so long and are confused about cycles in a way you didn't see when studying floyd-warshall in CS2302? How (well) do routing protocols deal with these limitations?
    • Due Mon 3/11
      • analysis (final section) of file transfer lab
    • Due Wed 3/13
      • Read
        • in detail:JSONRPC spec.
        • for reference (please at least scan): JSON RFC 4627
      • (simple): JSON lab
    • Due mon 3/28
      • Examine these
        • Video: Inside the Domain Name System from PeterExplainsTech :
        • Reading: All sectoins of Chapter 7.7 on DNS from Dordal's online text
        • DNS lookup flowchart: dns101: DNS Query Deconstructed
      • think about:
        • is this the "right" hierarchy? does it appropriately enable "locallity of control"
        • what are iterative & recursive queries? why provide both?
        • should use TCP or UDP?
        • what tradeoffs were made to enable high rates of dns lookup traffic?
        • what is the role of root & tld servers
        • security: what vulnerabilities does DNS have? (think about providing "extra" information in responses that poison future requests)
        • high throughput service (e.g. http fromm www.google.com) are implemented through global server replication. There are benefits to directing clients to nearby servers. Can DNS help with this:?
      • deadline extended as needed (just speak to the TA)
    • Due mon 4/24
      • Wireshark labs: part 1 (one hour)
    • Due Wed, 5/4
      • Take-home final part 1 (all questions)
      • Reference: detailed 4316 Learning Outcome Rubric Matrix
    • Due "Wed," 5/6 (friday outside el paso): please watch the "IPV6 Tutorial" and be familiar with the objectives and primary mechanisms (but not the details of) the four topics that follow.
      • watch: nice short video describing the IPV6 header: IPv6 Tutorial.
      • examine:two of the following to determine the "big ideas" regarding the roles and processes (but not the details of) two of the following
        • web page describing fragmentation
        • RFC 6437 on flow labels
        • RFC 2460 on routing headers
        • RFC 4302 on authentication headers
        • RFC 2675 on Jumbograms
    SVN repo for software assignments (not yet setup):
    • via subversion (svn).
    • You must be on the VPN (if not using a university-owned computer on a dedicated connection
    • Link: https://robust.cs.utep.edu/svn/classes/2016-spr-net/students/username
    • Username should be replaced with your name from your miner email addr. For example, mine is "efreudenthal"

    Computer Networks Homework Help

    Slideshare uses cookies to improve functionality and performance, and to provide you with relevant advertising. If you continue browsing the site, you agree to the use of cookies on this website. See our User Agreement and Privacy Policy.

    Slideshare uses cookies to improve functionality and performance, and to provide you with relevant advertising. If you continue browsing the site, you agree to the use of cookies on this website. See our Privacy Policy and User Agreement for details.

    Explore all your favorite topics in the SlideShare app Get the SlideShare app to Save for Later — even offline

    Continue to the mobile site »

    • Upload
    • Login
    • Signup

    Double tap to zoom out

    Computer Networks Homework Help

    Share this SlideShare

    LinkedIn Corporation © 2016

    DEBRA WASHINGTON: Homework: Session 11 - How Computers & Network Affect me

    Homework: Session 11 - How Computers & Network Affect me

    When I worked as a service representative, I couldn’t do my job without a computer. If the network went down, we were out of business for that length of time. On a typical day at work I was on the computer approximately 6 hours. Today, being in the school arena, substitute teaching, I don’t have as much access to the computer. That doesn’t exempt me from the use or need for one.

    One day last week, I took a day off. I did homework, on the computer and had to use the internet for access to a news article. I needed a battery for my phone so I went to AT&T’s Phone Center Store. Before I could get a battery, I had to sign into AT&T’s computer network, and wait for a representative to serve me. I went to the grocery store, short on cash, and had to use my debit card; of course, we all know that that’s a networked computerized machine.

    I only buy gasoline for my car at the ‘Pay at the Pump’ stations, so that’s another computer network. By the way, I hate when the machine is out of paper for your receipt. If I have to go inside to pay or get a receipt I keep it moving. I’d rather write down the amount of purchase on a piece of paper than walk inside the store. That’s terrible; I know, but I’ve gotten spoiled with all of the conveniences of swipe it and go.

    With all of that said, I still like writing checks. Cashiers run checks through a networked cash register, debit the funds, and give me back my check along with my receipt.

    There’s no getting away from computers and networks in our society today. To keep up, the ‘tech – no – savvy’ folks may have to take an online course, read a tutorial, take a continuing education class, or hire a tech that’s savvy.

    Computer Networks - CMSC 417, Spring 2000, Section 0101

    • 5/19. Homework 5 solutions are now available (at the usual place).
    • 5/11. Homework 4 solutions are now available (at the usual place).
    • 5/11. The term project code (final submission) is due on May 20 at noon; no late submissions allowed.
    • 5/9. Homework 5 has been assigned; it is due on Tuesday, May 16th, at the beginning of class.
    • 5/3. Another small modification was made to the RFC; the new version is posted below, the change is briefly described here.
    • 5/1. Percetage allocation (for the project and the course) have been posted above.
    • 5/1. Homework 4 has been assigned; it is due on Tuesday, May 9th, at the beginning of class.
    • 4/27. Another small modification was made to the RFC; the new version is posted below, the change is briefly described here.
    • 4/26. The TA posted a new parser on the project newsgroup. It is also included below.
    • 4/26. The updated RFC (based on the TA's comments during the last lecture) has been posted below. Please send email to me and the TA with problems.
    • 4/21. Term project RFC has been posted (below). Watch this web page for possible corrections. Please send email to me and the TA with problems.
    • 4/21. Group membership information for the term project has been posted below and on the term project newsgroup.
    • 4/17. There will not be a term project meeting today, Mon, 4/17, as I was unable to schedule it with the other section. Since we are unable to meet with the other section, we will resolve whatever significant questions (if any) remain about the term project design in class on Tue, 4/18. Given that we will not meet today, I am extending the submission deadline until Wed, 4/19, noon.
    • 4/14. Final exam will be on Monday, 5/22/00, 10:30 am-12:30 pm, in CSS 2324.
    • 4/14. Final RFC guidelines and task assignments for the term project have been posted below (as discussed in class and posted on the term project newsgroup).
    • 4/10. Reminder. If you haven't done so already, please post your RFC's (one per group) on the project newsgroup.
    • 4/5. The deadline for submission of each group's RFCs has been extended till Sunday, April 9th, midnight. NOTE: please do NOT post your RFC's on the term project newsgroup until AFTER the deadline.
    • 3/28. Term project description and outline have been re-posted below, as requested in class.
    • 3/17. Term project description was posted on the class and the term project newsgroups. Please also read RFC 1459 which describes IRC, Internet Relay Chat, (as I mentioned in class).
    • 3/14. Reminder: Midterm is on Thursday, March 30th.
    • 3/14. Homework 3 has been assigned; it is due on Tuesday, March 28th, at the beginning of class (note that late policy does not apply due to the midterm).

    • 3/14. Project 5 description has been posted. Note that the deadline is different from what I mentioned in class, i.e. it is March 27th. which is later than what I said in class.
    • 3/8. Read TA's posting about submission guidelines and his executables.
    • 3/9. Project 4's submitted by the original deadline will receive a 10% bonus, but only if they satisfy all project requirements.
    • 3/8. Read TA's posting about submission guidelines and his executables.
    • 3/8. Project 4 deadline is extended till March 13, Monday (midnight).
    • 3/6. Take a look at (today's) posting on the newsgroup regarding problem with function find_link.
    • 3/5. The TA posted a message on the newsgroup regarding a change in the "-v command line argument"; please read.
    • 3/2. Homework 2 has been posted and will be due on 3/14/2000 (beginning of class). Please see the homeworks page.
    • 3/1. Project 4 header files and code have been posted below.
    • 2/29. Project 4 description has been posted below. It is due on 3/9/2000 (midnight). Corresponding handouts will be posted soon.
    • 2/24. Project 3 deadline has been extended to midnight on Monday, 2/28/2000. Projects submitted before the original deadline (midnight 2/25/200) will receive a 10% bonus.
    • 2/24. Take a look at the news posting on Wed, 2/23, regarding a bug in db.c.
    • 2/23. Additional project 3 guidelines/notes have been posted below.
    • 2/21. Homework 1 has been posted and will be due on 2/29/2000. Please see the homeworks page.
    • 2/17. Project 3 description and corresponding handouts have been posted below.
    • 2/13. Sample code for the project 1 client has been posted on the class newsgroup.
    • 2/9. An update on the optional server hostname argument for Project 2 has been posted on the class newsgroup.
    • 2/9. A modification has been made to the port assignment description in Project 2; please take a look.

    • 2/9. Project 2 description is available below ; project 2 is due on 2/16/2000 (before midnight).
    • 2/6. Additional information for project 1 has been added to the project notes (regarding the difference between host byte order and network byte order); please take a look.
    • 2/1. The client code template and the header file included in the Project 1 description have been modified (on Tue Feb 1 18:59:31 EST 2000); the client template code now includes a command line parser. Some additions were also made to the project notes. Please check the new versions.
    • 2/1. Project 1 description is available below ; project 1 is due on 2/9/2000 (before midnight).
    • 1/24. You should obtain your account information (user ID and password) from the TA after the first lecture.